History Podcasts

J. Gary Shaw

J. Gary Shaw

Gary Shaw was formerly co-director with Larry N. He has written several books on the assassination of John F. Kennedy. He was co-author with Larry R. Harris of Cover-Up: The Government Conspiracy to Conceal the Facts About the Public Execution of John Kennedy (1976).

Shaw, now a self-employed architect in Cleburne, Texas, he is also co-author with Charles Crenshaw of Trauma Room One (2001).


  • Gary Shaw reminisces on Aston Villa's glory years during the early Eighties
  • The former Villa striker revels in the night Diego Maradona asked for his shirt
  • Shaw, now 57, helped Villa beat Bayern Munich to win the European Cup in 1982

Published: 22:30 BST, 25 May 2018 | Updated: 23:03 BST, 25 May 2018

Gary Shaw will get round to the time he was the only local lad in the Aston Villa team that shocked Bayern Munich to win the European Cup.

He will revel in the night Diego Maradona asked for his shirt, and smile at the memory of being man-marked nearly to the toilets by Claudio Gentile.

He will also talk candidly about the serious health fears he suffered after contracting septicaemia in 2016.

Former Aston Villa striker Gary Shaw poses in his home with a glass copy of the European Cup


Gary Shaw – A Short But Sparkling Career

Born in Kingshurst in 1961, Gary Shaw found fame as a young striker with Aston Villa FC from 1979.

He moved to Castle Bromwich in the early 1980s to the new houses that had just been built along Kingsleigh Drive.

Growing up on Meriden Drive on the newly-built Kingshurst estate, Gary’s football career began opposite the Punchbowl public house on a small grass patch, now covered with trees.

Attending Kingshurst Junior School, then Kingshurst Comprehensive (now the CTC Kingshurst Academy) in Cooks Lane, he found a regular place in the school football team, later playing for the Warwickshire Schools’ team, amongst others. In 1977 at the age of 16 he was taken on by 1st Division club Aston Villa as an apprentice player, signing as a professional on his 18th birthday after making his debut in the first team.

Winning First Division Championship…..

Gary Shaw came to prominence the following season scoring 12 goals, including a hat trick. In 1981 he helped Villa to the First Division Championship, scoring 18 goals at an average of a goal every two-and-a-half games.

He was a perfect partner up front with Peter Withe and, as a Birmingham boy, was a favourite with the fans. The same season he also won the Professional Footballers Association Young Player of the Year award.

…..And The European Cup

The only local team member, he played in Aston Villa’s famous European Cup victory in 1982 when Peter Withe’s only goal of the match beat Bayern Munich at Rotterdam. A banner on the North stand at Villa Park spells out the words of Brian Moore’s television commentary: ‘Shaw, Williams, prepared to venture down the left. There’s a good ball in for Tony Morley. Oh, it must be and it is! It’s Peter Withe.’

Retires Through Injury

Unfortunately that season marked the beginning of the end of Shaw’s short but glorious career. He sustained a knee injury at Nottingham Forest after which he was never to recover his speed and agility. He underwent six knee operations over the next four years and played for Villa until 1988.

Gary subsequently played briefly for clubs in Austria, Scotland and Hong Kong and for Shrewsbury and Walsall before returning to the Midlands working in a variety of different jobs.

During his short but memorable time at Aston Villa, Gary Shaw made 165 appearances and scored 59 goals. He was a member of the team that won the Division One Championship in 1981 and the European Cup in 1982. And rumour has it that he can still be seen supporting his old club at the Holte End.

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About The Author

I was born in Southport, Lancashire (now Merseyside) my family origins are to be found in the wild hills of Westmoreland. I trained as a teacher at St Peter's College, Saltley, qualifying in 1968 and have now worked as a primary school teacher in Birmingham for well over forty years. Read More…


J. Gary Shaw - History

Although born in England, Shaw studied for his first degree in fine art at the University of South Australia, where he had several group and solo shows before he moved to Belfast, Northern Ireland. He attained his Masters in Fine Art at the University of Ulster and is considered one of our finest abstract artists.

His work has been shown as far afield as America (with a Residency in New York), Australia, Canada (Banff Residency), China, Indonesia, Germany and Spain, as well as shows throughout the British Isles.

The endless variety of patterns and colours has always appealed to Gary, as witnessed by his blocks of solid colour, his painting of jockey's silks, the maritime flags and the geometrical shapes used to communicate with the viewer.

Gary has recently been developing a new body of work drawing the many characters he sees from his studio and on his travels.

Available to buy at gallery or online within UK and Ireland (£10 postage)

Available to buy at gallery or online within UK and Ireland (£10 postage)


J. Gary Shaw - History

Born in Kingshurst in 1961, Gary Shaw found fame as a young striker with Aston Villa FC from 1979.

He moved to Castle Bromwich in the early 1980s to the new houses that had just been built along Kingsleigh Drive.

Growing up on Meriden Drive on the newly-built Kingshurst estate, Gary’s football career began opposite the Punchbowl public house on a small grass patch, now covered with trees.

Attending Kingshurst Junior School, then Kingshurst Comprehensive (now the CTC Kingshurst Academy) in Cooks Lane, he found a regular place in the school football team, later playing for the Warwickshire Schools’ team, amongst others. In 1977 at the age of 16 he was taken on by 1st Division club Aston Villa as an apprentice player, signing as a professional on his 18th birthday after making his debut in the first team.

Winning First Division Championship…..

Gary Shaw came to prominence the following season scoring 12 goals, including a hat trick. In 1981 he helped Villa to the First Division Championship, scoring 18 goals at an average of a goal every two-and-a-half games.

He was a perfect partner up front with Peter Withe and, as a Birmingham boy, was a favourite with the fans. The same season he also won the Professional Footballers Association Young Player of the Year award.

…..And The European Cup

The only local team member, he played in Aston Villa’s famous European Cup victory in 1982 when Peter Withe’s only goal of the match beat Bayern Munich at Rotterdam. A banner on the North stand at Villa Park spells out the words of Brian Moore’s television commentary: ‘Shaw, Williams, prepared to venture down the left. There’s a good ball in for Tony Morley. Oh, it must be and it is! It’s Peter Withe.’

Retires Through Injury

Unfortunately that season marked the beginning of the end of Shaw’s short but glorious career. He sustained a knee injury at Nottingham Forest after which he was never to recover his speed and agility. He underwent six knee operations over the next four years and played for Villa until 1988.

Gary subsequently played briefly for clubs in Austria, Scotland and Hong Kong and for Shrewsbury and Walsall before returning to the Midlands working in a variety of different jobs.

During his short but memorable time at Aston Villa, Gary Shaw made 165 appearances and scored 59 goals. He was a member of the team that won the Division One Championship in 1981 and the European Cup in 1982. And rumour has it that he can still be seen supporting his old club at the Holte End.

Looking for something?

About The Author

I was born in Southport, Lancashire (now Merseyside) my family origins are to be found in the wild hills of Westmoreland. I trained as a teacher at St Peter's College, Saltley, qualifying in 1968 and have now worked as a primary school teacher in Birmingham for well over forty years. Read More…


Collingwood Forever

GARY Shaw arrived at Victoria Park in 1983 as one of the country’s most sought-after rovers. He left it at the end of four seasons as one of the unfortunate scapegoats for the largesse of the New Magpies, who had staged the most audacious and expensive recruiting campaign in the club’s history.

Shaw’s 32 games – and 33 goals – for the Magpies was hardly the return he or those who recruited him expected. Making it even less palatable was the fact his transfer fee alone cost the Magpies more than $300,000 – the equivalent of half a dozen Melbourne suburban homes at the time.

But that he was considered the centrepiece for blame for Collingwood’s financial mess by the mid-1980s seems unfair, given other players had also cost the club a small fortune, and that it was the administration – not the players themselves – who were so profligate with their money.

Besides, the speedy and skilful rover – a Queensland native who had dominated in two seasons in the WAFL before signing on to play with Collingwood – failed to make a lasting impression in black and white largely due to a host of injuries he encountered.

Shaw’s father had played for Western Districts (now the Western Magpies), in Queensland, and football always played a significant part in Gary’s upbringing. Always a diminutive rover, he was considered too small for the Queensland under-15s team in 1976, with selectors overlooking him from the team as a result. Yet when he trained for the state’s under-17s Teal Cup side in the same year, he was not only selected, but won the award as the most outstanding Queensland player, as a 15-year-old!

He showed talent from a very early age, playing his junior career with Sherwood (also in black and white colours), where incredibly he never played in a losing side. That winning streak stretched from his first year in the under-9s all the way through to his second year in the under-17s.

In 1981 he moved to Western Australia, as a 22-year-old, to play with Claremont in the WAFL. He quickly went on to become, as one newspaper put it, “a sheer sensation in the west.”

Shaw more than held his own in what was an outstanding Claremont team in 1981, which included the Krakouer brothers (Jim and Phil), Brownlow Medallist Graham Moss, Stephen Malaxos and a host of other players who would go onto VFL careers. He had 21 disposals for Claremont in the 1981 grand final and was adjudged as joint Simpson Medallist, alongside South Fremantle’s Maurice Rioli.

He was even better the following season, winning Claremont’s best and fairest award in 1982, and finishing a narrow runner-up in the Sandover Medal. He also represented Western Australia, and by season’s end was considered the best rover outside the VFL.

Today his name is considered a byword for the profligacy of the New Magpies era, but back then he was genuinely hot property. In the west he was considered to have electric pace, and his spearing passes to leading forwards were said to be things of beauty. He used the ball well, got plenty of it, and seemed to have all the ingredients needed to make it in the VFL.

Collingwood was the club chasing the hardest for his services, desperate for a classy rover. Shaw looked to be the perfect fit. But he came at a cost. At a time when it seemed as if money was being thrown about in the VFL almost as if it was confetti, Shaw’s transfer fees alone were more than $300,000.

That wasn’t his fault, but the expectation coupled with the price tag put significant pressure on the 24-year-old, who once described himself as “a bit of a clown” when he moved to Melbourne. From the outset, there was talk of locker-room discontent at Collingwood.

He started as second rover to Tony Shaw, and played well early, without being outstanding, kicking a goal in each of his first five matches and nailing three in Round 4 game against Essendon. But a stress fracture in the shin ruined the rest of his debut season.

Shaw enjoyed a solid 1984, kicking five against North Melbourne and starring in several other games as he managed 19 games for the season. But solid wasn’t enough: the club had paid big bucks for a star, and occasional good games were never going to keep the critics at bay.

Injuries – often cruelly timed – frustrated him throughout 1985 and again in 1986. By the end of 1986, it was clear Shaw’s time at Collingwood was over. He was one of three Magpies who the club had nominated as being made available to the newly formed Brisbane Bears.

Resilient in mind, if not in body, Shaw resolved to keep trying at his new club: “I won’t say I’ve failed until I’ve had one full season. Every time I’ve started playing well I’ve been hurt. I still think I’m good enough. All I want is a fair chance to prove it.”

He agreed to a three-year deal with the Bears, but lasted only one. He played six games in 1987 before his body again failed him, this time with a back injury, before playing out most of the season with his old club Western Districts.

The Bears tried to convince him to play on, but Shaw had finally had enough. The grind of all those injuries, and the weight of all that pressure, finally got to him, and he retired at the age of 28.


J. Gary Shaw - History

In his Foreword to Michael Marcades’ book on Rose Cherami (which
is part of the book you can read at Amazon.com), J. Gary Shaw claims that
two men knew in advance about JFK’s assassination. The first he
doesn’t name for some reason, but it’s obviously Joseph
Milteer.

About the second, he writes:

About the same time, a Dallas independent oilman told a Texas businessman
and his wife that Kennedy would be killed when he came to Dallas. He said
the re were three oilmen who would put up the money. I have met with and
interviewed the man who was told of the threat. Now deceased, he was a
well-respected businessman known for his integrity.

As it turns out, this same oilman had purchased a high caliber rifle in
downtown Dallas on the morning of the assassination and purportedly been
seen by at least two witnesses carrying the rifle west on Elm Street
toward Dealey Plaza.

Interestingly, a few years after the assassination, the oilman purchased a
ranch in Texas’s hill country located a short distance from the
LBJ Ranch, home of President and Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson. Available records
reveal that the Johnson’s [sic] are known to have flown by
helicopter to the oilman’s ranch on occasion for dinner.

The oilman was questioned by the FBI regarding the threats, which he
denied. He was never asked about his whereabouts or actions at the time of
the president’s murder.

Anyone have any idea who this oilman and businessman were, and what
Shaw’s sources are for the rifle purchase, the two witnesses who
saw him (him in particular, not just people who saw someone with a gun or
a gun case in Dallas on 11/22/63), and the FBI interview?

Shaw’s Foreword also includes some dubious (but not new) claims
about Ruby stripper Karen Bennett Carlin.


Outsider Cops
By: J. Gary Shaw

The Caribbean Case was supposed to be an easy one for Chief Detective Curtis Cole and his partner Detective William Strong – solve eight suspicious deaths, plus assist two United States Drug Enforcement Agents to take down an international drug cartel. But it was not easy. They quickly discovered that the Palm Island Police Service would not help them. The Commissioner of Police was a greedy dictatorial, lying, despicable person who was coercing his staff and the public to facilitate an international drug cartel. Cole had to use every trick learned from years of experience to stay alive, and get the job done. Each day became a new challenge to find who to trust. As the window of opportunity started to close, he planned a historic raid. Detective Strong exclaimed, “This is war!”

Sun, sea, sand, sex, and murder – the mission was not a holiday!

J. Gary Shaw, was born and educated in Canada. He is a CPA who holds a degree in Honors Business Administration and a Canadian Securities Course Certificate.

He has visited many countries world-wide. During those times he dealt with many people who were honest, but also, many who were dishonest and wished they had never met Mr. Shaw. Consequently he chose to write this novel. Nothing is beyond his imagination.


Rakuten Kobo

The Caribbean Case was supposed to be an easy one for Chief Detective Curtis Cole and his partner Detective William Strong – solve eight suspicious deaths, plus assist two United States Drug Enforcement Agents to take down an international drug cartel. But it was not easy. They quickly discovered that the Palm Island Police Service would not help them. The Commissioner of Police was a greedy dictatorial, lying, despicable person who was coercing his staff and the public to facilitate an international drug cartel. Cole had to use every trick learned from years of experience to stay alive, and get the job done. Each day became a new challenge to find who to trust. As the window of opportunity started to close, he planned a historic raid. Detective Strong exclaimed, “This is war!”

Sun, sea, sand, sex, and murder – the mission was not a holiday!

J. Gary Shaw, was born and educated in Canada. He is a CPA who holds a degree in Honors Business Administration and a Canadian Securities Course Certificate.

He has visited many countries world-wide. During those times he dealt with many people who were honest, but also, many who were dishonest and wished they had never met Mr. Shaw. Consequently he chose to write this novel. Nothing is beyond his imagination.


J. Gary Shaw, Jens Hansen, Charles A. Crenshaw

Published by Pinnacle Books,U.S., 2013

Seller: WeBuyBooks, Rossendale, LANCS, United Kingdom
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Used - Softcover
Condition: Good

Mass Market Paperback. Condition: Good. Good condition is defined as: a copy that has been read but remains in clean condition. All of the pages are intact and the cover is intact and the spine may show signs of wear. The book may have minor markings which are not specifically mentioned. Most items will be dispatched the same or the next working day.


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