History Podcasts

Griffin AS-13 - History

Griffin AS-13 - History

Griffin AS-13

Griffin

Robert Stanislaus Griffin was born 27 September 1857, and graduated from the Naval Academy in 1878. He served in Tennessee, Philadelphia, and Vicksburg, and took part in the Cuban blockade of 1898 in gunboat Mayflower. Griffin rose from Fleet Engineer, North Atlantic Fleet, in 1904 to.Engineer in Chief and head of the Bureau of Steam Engineering in 1913. Until 1921, Rear Admiral Griffin performed outstanding service in designing, building, and maintaining ship machinery, and in converting
captured German vessels. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal by the President. Rear Admiral Griff-n died 21 February 1933 at Washington, D C

(AS-13: dp. 14.000; 1. 492'; b. 71'; dr. 25'10"; s. 17 k.;
cpl.9ll;a.l4", 13")
Griffin (AS-13), originally Mormacpenn, a Maritime
Commission C-3 type pre-war cargo ship, was launched
by Sun Shipbuilding & Dry Dock., Chester, Pa, 11 October
1939. She served briefly with Moore-McCormack, Inc.,
was acquired by the Navy in 1940, renamed Griffin(AS
13) and converted to a submarine tender at Robbins Dry
Dock & Repair Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. Griffin commissioned
31 July 1941, Comdr. S. D. Jupp in command.

Her conversion completed in September 1941, a"~n conducted shakedown off the East Coast and sailed with a sub squadron to Newfoundland 22 November 1941. Recalled to Newport, R.I., after Pearl Harbor, the ship was assigned to the Pacific Fleet, and departed 14 February for Australia.

Griffin arrived Brisbane 15 April l942 to tend Submarine Squadron 5. Early in the war, the United States developed a mayor submarine base in Australia; and submarines tended by Griffin struck hard at Japanese shipping while surface forces strengthened themselves for the first Pacific offensives. During this period Griffin also repaired merchant ships at a time of great need. The tender departed Brisbane for the Fiji Islands 11 November and 1 December sailed to Bora Bora to escort Submarine Division 53 to the Canal Zone. Arriving Balboa 7 January 1943, Griffin continued north to Oakland, Calif., arriving 20 January.

After repairs at San Diego, Griffin again departed for the Pacific, sailing 27 April 1943. She arrived Pearl Harbor 4 May to take up her vital support duties, and remained until 3 January 1944. The ship performed refits, battle repairs, and general upkeep on submarines before sailing to Mare Island to arrove 10 January.

Griffin returned to Pearl Harbor 17 March, and departed 8 April for the great submarine base at Fremantle, Australia. She arrived 8 May and immediately set about servicing the growing submarine fleet. The tender remained at Fremantle until 20 November 1944, during her stay founding a rubber fabrication shop which solved one of the great shortages on board the submarines. She then moved closer to the Japanese~e shipping lanes at Mios Woendi, New Guinea, arriving 9 December. There she tended submarines, surface craft of all kinds, and even lent her repair equipment to shore facilities. Griffin remained at Mios Woendi until 1 February 1945 when she sailed for Subic Bay, via Leyte.

Arriving 10 February, Griffin set up one of the initial submarine repair facilities in the Philippines since 1942. She also helped to salvage damaged destroyer LaVallette Shifting base, the tender sailed 22 March via Leyte, and arrived in the Hawaiian Islands 10 April. After a brief stay at Pearl she departed 10 May for Midway, arrived 4 days later, and set up another repair facility for sub marines. By that time submarines supported by Griffin had practically annihilated Japanese merchant shipping and had played a decisive role in the great Pacific offensive. She remained at Midway until 10 September, then sailed to Pearl Harbor and San Francisco, entering the bay 24 September, Decommissioned at Mare Island 12 October 1945, the ship was placed in reserve. Later she transferred to the Stockton group, Pacific Reserve Fleet, where she remains in reserve, in service, tending reserve submarine~ through 1967.



USS Griffin (AS-13)

USS Griffin (AS-13), originally Mormacpenn, a United States Maritime Commission Type C3 pre-war cargo ship, was launched by Sun Shipbuilding & Dry Dock, Chester, Pennsylvania, 11 October 1939. She served briefly with Moore-McConnack, Inc., was acquired by the Navy in 1940, renamed Griffin (AS-13) and converted to a submarine tender at Robbins Dry Dock and Repair Company, Brooklyn, N.Y. Griffin commissioned 31 July 1941, Comdr. S. D. Jupp in command.

  • Sun Shipbuilding & Dry Dock, Chester, Pennsylvania
  • Converted by Robbins Dry Dock and Repair Company, Brooklyn, New York
  • four single 3 in (76 mm) caliber DP gun mounts
  • one single 5"/51 caliber gun

Her conversion completed in September 1941, Griffin conducted shakedown off the East Coast and sailed with a sub squadron to Newfoundland 22 November 1941. Recalled to Newport, Rhode Island, after Pearl Harbor, the ship was assigned to the United States Pacific Fleet, and departed 14 February 1942 for Australia.

Griffin arrived Brisbane 15 April 1942 to tend Submarine Squadron 5. Early in the war, the United States developed a major submarine base in Australia and submarines tended by Griffin struck hard at Japanese shipping while surface forces strengthened themselves for the first Pacific offensives. During this period Griffin also repaired merchant ships at a time of great need. The tender departed Brisbane for the Fiji Islands 11 November 1942 and 1 December 1942 sailed to Bora Bora to escort Submarine Division 53 to the Panama Canal Zone. Arriving Balboa 7 January 1943, Griffin continued north to Oakland, California, arriving 20 January 1943.

After repairs at San Diego, California, Griffin again departed for the Pacific, sailing 27 April 1943. She arrived Pearl Harbor 4 May 1943 to take up her vital support duties, and remained until 3 January 1944. The ship performed refits, battle repairs, and general upkeep on submarines before sailing to Mare Island to arrive 10 January 1944.

Griffin returned to Pearl Harbor 17 March 1944, and departed 8 April 1944 for the great submarine base at Fremantle, Western Australia. She arrived 8 May and immediately set about servicing the growing submarine fleet. The tender remained at Fremantle until 20 November 1944, during her Stay founding a rubber fabrication shop which solved one of the great shortages on board the submarines. She then moved closer to the Japanese shipping lanes at Mios Woendi, New Guinea, arriving 9 December 1944. There she tended submarines, surface craft of all kinds, and even lent her repair equipment to shore facilities. Griffin remained at Mios Woendi until 1 February 1945 when she sailed for Subic Bay, via Leyte.

Arriving 10 February 1945, Griffin set up one of the initial submarine repair facilities in the Philippines since 1942. She also helped to salvage damaged destroyer La Vallette (DD-448) . Shifting base, the tender sailed 22 March 1945 via Leyte, and arrived in the Hawaiian Islands 10 April 1945. After a brief stay at Pearl she departed 10 May 1945 for Midway, arrived 4 days later, and set up another repair facility for submarines. By that time submarines supported by Griffin had practically annihilated Japanese merchant shipping and had played a decisive role in the great Pacific offensive. She remained at Midway until 10 September 1945, then sailed to Pearl Harbor and San Francisco, entering the bay 24 September. Decommissioned at Mare Island 12 October 1945, the ship was placed in reserve. Later she transferred to the Stockton group, Pacific Reserve Fleet, where she remained in reserve, in service, tending reserve submarines, until at least 1967.

She was stricken in 1972 and transferred to MARAD. She was sold in 1973.

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. The entry can be found here.


Tim Griffin

Tim Griffin is visiting associate professor at the Ohio State University. From 2003 to 2010, Griffin was editor in chief of Artforum, where he organized special issues on the legacies of minimalism and land art models of performance art and its markets poetics and political theory and the museum in a contemporary context.

From 2011 to 2020, he was executive director and chief curator of The Kitchen in New York, where he oversaw an interdisciplinary program featuring Chantal Akerman, ANOHNI, Charles Atlas, Gretchen Bender, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Ralph Lemon, Aki Sasamoto, and Tyshawn Sorey, among many others in addition to group exhibitions such as "From Minimalism into Algorithm" and "On Whiteness," organized with the Racial Imaginary Institute. He also conceived new initiatives including the interdisciplinary talks series “The Kitchen L.A.B.” and electronic music series “Synth Nights.”

Griffin has a MFA in poetry from Bard College’s Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, and has written extensively on artists such as Chantal Akerman, Wade Guyton, Paul Sietsema, Ralph Lemon, and Taryn Simon. Griffin's texts have appeared in October, Art Journal, Bomb, and Bookforum, among other publications and he penned keynote essays for the 2009 retrospective of John Baldessari at Tate Modern, "Pure Beauty" the catalogue raisonné of German artist Martin Kippenberger and for the 2016 Hugo Boss Prize catalogue featuring Ralph Lemon at the Guggenheim Museum. In 2015, he was awarded the insignia of chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters.


The ancient origins of the legendary griffin

The griffin is a legendary creature with the head and wings of an eagle, and the body, tail, and hind legs of a lion. As the eagle was considered the ‘king of the birds’, and the lion the ‘king of the beasts’, the griffin was perceived as a powerful and majestic creature. During the Persian Empire, the griffin was seen as a protector from evil, witchcraft, and slander.

Although the griffin is often seen in medieval heraldry, its origins stretch further back in time. For instance, the ancient Greek historian Herodotus wrote

“But in the north of Europe there is by far the most gold. In this matter again I cannot say with assurance how the gold is produced, but it is said that one-eyed men called Arimaspians steal it from griffins. But I do not believe this, that there are one-eyed men who have a nature otherwise the same as other men. The most outlying lands, though, as they enclose and wholly surround all the rest of the world, are likely to have those things which we think the finest and the rarest.” (Herodotus, The Histories , 3.116)

While griffins are most common in the art and mythology of Ancient Greece, there is evidence of representations of griffins in ancient Persia and ancient Egypt dating back to as early as the 4 th millennium BC. On the island of Crete in Greece, archaeologists have uncovered depictions of griffins in frescoes in the ‘Throne Room’ of the Bronze Age Palace of Knossos dating back to the 15 th century BC.

Griffin fresco in the "Throne Room", Palace of Knossos, Crete. Credit: Wikipedia

Interestingly, there are various hybrid creatures that are similar to the griffin. For instance, the Lamassu was an Assyrian mythical creature that had the head of a man, a body of a lion or bull, and the wings of an eagle.

The Lamassu, a human-headed winged bull. University of Chicago Oriental Institute. Neo-Assyrian Period, c. 721-705 BCE. Credit: Wikipedia

Further to the east, a part-man, part-bird creature, the Garuda, served as a mount for the Hindu god Vishnu. Perhaps the fascination with such hybrid creatures is due to the fact that it allows people to combine the best characteristics of two or more creatures into one ’super creature’, allowing meaningful symbolism to be attached to them.

This may hold true for the griffin in the Middle Ages. In European legend of this period, it was believed that griffins mated for life, and that when one partner died, the other would live the rest of his/her without seeking another partner (perhaps due to the fact that there weren’t many griffins around). This has led to claims that the griffin was used by the Church as a symbol against re-marriage. It is unclear, however, whether this was the actual belief, or just a modern interpretation.

Although the griffin might seem like a creature conjured from the imagination of mankind, there might actually be some truth to this creature. One theory suggests that the griffin was brought to Europe by traders travelling along the Silk Road from the Gobi Desert in Mongolia. In this desert, the fossils of a dinosaur called the Protoceratops can be found. As these bones, especially the skull, which has a bird-like beak, were exposed on the desert floor, ancient observers may have interpreted them as proof that such a hybrid creature once lived in the desert. Yet, it has been shown that stories of the griffin have been around even before the Silk Road was developed. Perhaps it was stories about the griffin that made the traders interpret the fossils of the Protoceratops as that of the legendary creature.

Regardless of its origins, the griffin has been part of human culture for a very long time and persists today, as seen in various school emblems, mascots, and even popular literature. It is likely that the griffin and other hybrid mythical creatures will continue to play a role in mankind’s imagination for a long time to come.

Featured image: An artist’s representation of a griffin. Image source.

Buffalo Architecture and History, 2009. Illustrated Dictionary of Egyptian Mythology. [Online]
Available at: http://buffaloah.com/a/archsty/egypt/illus/illus.html

[Godley, A. D. (trans.), 1920. Herodotus’ The Histories . Cambridge: Harvard University Press.]


Related Research Articles

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USS Jenkins (DD-447) was a Fletcher-class destroyer in the service of the United States Navy, the second ship named after Rear Admiral Thornton A. Jenkins. Beginning service during World War II, the destroyer saw action in the Pacific theatre. Jenkins was placed in reserve following the end of the war, remaining in this state until 1951, when the ship was reactivated for the Korean War. She served in the western Pacific until 1969 when the destroyer was taken out of service and sold for scrap in 1971.

The second USS Tangier (AV-8) was a cargo ship, converted to a seaplane tender in the United States Navy during World War II. Constructed in 1939, the vessel was acquired by the U.S. Navy in 1940. The ship was present during the Attack on Pearl Harbor that drew the United States into World War II. Tangier saw service throughout the Pacific until the end of the war. Following the war, the vessel was placed in reserve until 1961 when the vessel was sold for mercantile use. Renamed Detroit in 1962 and converted to a car carrier, the vessel continued in service until 1974, when the ship was sold for scrap and broken up.

USS Goldsborough (DD-188/AVP-18/AVD-5/APD-32) was a Clemson-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. She was the second Navy ship named for Rear Admiral Louis M. Goldsborough (1805�). Entering service in 1920, the ship had a brief active life before being placed in reserve in 1922. Goldsborough was reactivated for World War II and was used as an aircraft tender, destroyer and high speed transport in both Atlantic and Pacific theaters. Following the war, the ship was sold for scrapping in 1946.

USS Wright (AZ-1/AV-1) was a one-of-a-kind auxiliary ship in the United States Navy, named for aviation pioneer Orville Wright. Originally built as a kite balloon tender, she was converted into a seaplane tender after kite balloons were no longer used.

USS Sumner (AG-32/AGS-5) was a survey ship in the United States Navy. She was named in honor of Thomas Sumner. She was originally commissioned as a submarine tender as USS Bushnell (AS-2), in honor of David Bushnell, the inventor of the first American submarine.

USS Jobb (DE-707) was a Rudderow-class destroyer escort of the United States Navy, named after Richard Patrick Jobb, born in McCormick, Washington, on 17 March 1920. He enlisted in the Navy on 28 February 1942. He was at Guadalcanal for America's first amphibious operation of the Pacific War. Hearing a call of a patrol subjected to enemy fire near the Namara River on 26 January 1943, Pharmacist's Mate Third Class Jobb rushed forward 150 yards (140 m) through intense enemy fire to aid the wounded. He continued to dress casualties under fire until he was himself hit and killed. For his courageous devotion to duty, Jobb was posthumously awarded the Silver Star.

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USS LST-453 was a United States Navy LST-1-class tank landing ship used in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater during World War II. She was converted at Brisbane, Australia, into an Achelous-class repair ship, shortly after commissioning, and used in the repairing of landing craft. She was later renamed for Remus, she was the only US Naval vessel to bear the name.

USS Butternut (AN-9/YN-4/ANL-9/YAG-60) was laid down as a yard net tender on 11 March 1941 at Houghton, Washington, by the Lake Washington Shipyard launched on 10 May 1941 and placed in service at the Puget Sound Navy Yard on 3 September 1941, Lieutenant Andreas S. Einmo, USNR, in charge.

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Griffin AS 13 Covers Page 1

 
Covers should be listed in chronological order. Use the postmark date or best guess.
 
Each entry provides a link to the image of the front of the cover. There is also the option to have a link to the image of the back of the cover if there is anything of significance there. Finally, there is the primary date for the cover and the classification types for all postmarks based on the Locy System.

Thumbnail Link To Cachet Close-Up Image Thumbnail Link To
Full Cover Front Image
Thumbnail Link To
Postmark or Back Image
Primary Date
Postmark Type
Killer Bar Text
---------
Cachet Category

1941-08-25
Locy Type FDPS 3
"FIRST DAY / MAIL"
(No year in dial)

First Day of Postal Service

1941-08-25
Locy Type FDPS 3
"FIRST DAY / MAIL"

1941-08-25
Locy Type FDPS 3
"FIRST DAY / MAIL"

Weigand hand painted cachet

1941-08-25
Locy Type FDPS 3
"FIRST DAY / MAIL"

Weigand hand painted cachet

1941-08-25
Locy Type FDPS 3
"FIRST DAY / MAIL"

Weigand hand painted cachet

1941-08-25
Locy Type FDPS 9efw

1942-02-28
Locy Type 3z (BTT)

Censored wartime (WWII) use
Back return to ship at New York

1942-06-06
Locy Type 3z (BTT)

Censored wartime (WWII) use

c1942-10-29
Locy Type 3z (BTT)

Censored wartime (WWII) use

If you have images to add to this page, then either contact the Curator or edit this page yourself and add them. See Editing Ship Cover Pages for detailed information on editing this page.


Griffin History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Griffin surname is derived from the Welsh personal names Griffin, Gruffin, or Griffith. These were pet-forms of the Middle Welsh name Gruffudd, which was borne by many Welsh princes. The name came to Ireland in the 12th century with the Anglo- Norman invasion of Strongbow. There was also a native Irish line whose name originally appeared in Gaelic as O Gríobhtha, which is derived from the word "gríobhtha," which means "griffin-like." It is thought that most of the bearers of the Griffith variant of the name are of Welsh ancestry.

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Early Origins of the Griffin family

The surname Griffin was first found in the province of Munster, where they had been granted lands by Strongbow after the Anglo Norman invasion into Ireland in 1172.

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Early History of the Griffin family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Griffin research. Another 81 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1st , 10, and 1710 are included under the topic Early Griffin History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Griffin Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Griffin, O'Griffin, Griffen, O'Griffen, Griffith, Griffey, Griffy, O'Griffy and many more.

Early Notables of the Griffin family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Griffin Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Griffin migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Griffin Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Reginald Griffin, who landed in Virginia in 1621 [1]
  • Rise Griffin, aged 24, who arrived in Virginia in 1621 [1]
  • Richard Griffin, who settled in Virginia in 1623
  • George Griffin who settled in St. Christopher in 1633 and later moved to Virginia
  • Elias Griffin, who arrived in Virginia in 1634 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Griffin Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Owen Griffin, who landed in Virginia in 1701 [1]
  • Humphrey Griffin, who landed in Virginia in 1712 [1]
  • Henry Griffin, who arrived in Virginia in 1713 [1]
  • Ambrose Griffin, who arrived in Virginia in 1714 [1]
  • Andrew Griffin, who landed in Virginia in 1715 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Griffin Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Lady Christina Griffin, who arrived in Virginia in 1807 [1]
  • Daw Griffin, who arrived in New York, NY in 1811 [1]
  • Benjamin Pitt Griffin, aged 27, who arrived in New York in 1812 [1]
  • Jeremiah Griffin, aged 35, who landed in New York in 1812 [1]
  • Geo Griffin, aged 19, who landed in Key West, Fla in 1837 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Griffin migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Griffin Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • John Griffin, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749-1752
  • William Griffin, who arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1749-1752
  • John Griffin, who arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1752
  • William Griffin, who arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1752
  • Mr. John Griffin U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on October 26, 1783 was passenger number 154 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on September 28, 1783 at Staten Island, New York [2]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Griffin Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • John Griffin, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1815
  • Mary Leasy Griffin, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1822
  • Catherine Griffin, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1830
  • Horatio N Griffin, who arrived in Canada in 1830
  • Ellen Griffin, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1833
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Griffin migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Griffin Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Oliver Griffin, Irish convict who was convicted in Meath, Ireland for 7 years, transported aboard the "Atlas" on 29th November 1801, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[3]
  • Miss Teresa Griffin, (b. 1795), aged 18, Irish convict who was convicted in Dublin, Ireland for 7 years, transported aboard the "Catherine" on 8th December 1813, arriving in New South Wales, Australia, she died in 1816 [4]
  • Mr. William Griffin, (b. 1791), aged 31, Irish ploughman who was convicted in Cork, Ireland for life for rioting, transported aboard the "Brampton" on 8th November 1822, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • Henry Griffin, English convict from Berkshire, who was transported aboard the "Albion" on May 17, 1823, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia[6]
  • Mrs. Mary Griffin, (b. 1794), aged 32, Irish country servant who was convicted in Limerick, Ireland for 7 years for stealing, transported aboard the "Brothers" on 3rd October 1826, arriving in New South Wales, Australia, listed as having 6 children [7]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Griffin migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Griffin Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • John Griffin, who landed in Nelson, New Zealand in 1840
  • John Griffin, aged 19, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Sir Charles Forbes" in 1842
  • Mr. CharlesGriffin, British settler travelling from Gravesend, UK aboard the ship "Duke of Portland" arriving in New Plymouth, North Island, New Zealand in 1855 [8]
  • Mrs. Griffin, British settler travelling from Gravesend, UK aboard the ship "Duke of Portland" arriving in New Plymouth, North Island, New Zealand in 1855 [8]
  • Oliver Griffin, aged 25, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Shamrock" in 1856
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Griffin (post 1700) +

  • Gerald D. "Gerry" Griffin (b. 1934), American former NASA flight director and director of Johnson Space Center and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom
  • Roger Francis Griffin (1935-2021), British astronomer and emeritus professor of Observational Astronomy at the University of Cambridge
  • James Patrick Griffin (1933-2019), American-born philosopher, White's Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of Oxford from 1996 to 2000
  • Prof. George Edward Griffin C.B.E., British Emeritus Professor for Infectious Diseases and Medicine for St George's at University of London, was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire on 8th June 2018, for services to Public Health and to Health Research [9]
  • Dr. Anthony Griffin B.E.M., British recipient of Medallist of the British Empire Medal 29th December 2018 for services to Sport, to Charity and to the community in Bolton [9]
  • Ms. Barbara Griffin M.B.E., British Trustee for Citizens’ Advice Salford, was appointed Member of the Order of the British Empire on 29th December 2018 for services to the voluntary sector and to the community in Salford [9]
  • Mr. Norman Griffin O.B.E., British Senior Manager for Long Term and High Security Estate Directorate, Ministry of Justice, was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire on 29th December 2018 for services to Public Sector Prisons [9]
  • Mr. Paul David Griffin M.B.E., British Corporal for the Intelligence Corps, was appointed Member of the Order of the British Empire on 29th December 2018 [9]
  • Miriam Tamara Griffin (1935-2018), née Dressler, an American classical scholar and tutor of Ancient History at Somerville College, Oxford (1967-2002)
  • LaShell Renee Griffin (b. 1968), American gospel musician
  • . (Another 30 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Historic Events for the Griffin family +

Arrow Air Flight 1285
Empress of Ireland
  • Mrs. Violetta Griffin (1887-1914), née Boaz Canadian Third Class Passenger from Brantford, Ontario, Canada who was traveling aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [11]
  • Mrs. Grace Griffin (1886-1914), née Withnell Canadian Second Class Passenger from Cloverdale, British Columbia, Canada who was traveling aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [11]
  • Miss Winniefred Griffin (1913-1914), Canadian Second Class Passenger from Cloverdale, British Columbia, Canada who was traveling aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [11]
HMS Hood
  • Mr. Charles A Griffin (b. 1921), English Marine serving for the Royal Marine from Alresford, Hampshire, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [12]
HMS Royal Oak
  • Harry Griffin (d. 1939), British Boy 1st Class with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he died in the sinking [13]
USS Arizona
  • Mr. Lawrence J. Griffin, American Private First Class from Louisiana, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Reese Olin Griffin, American Electrician's Mate Third Class from Texas, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [14]

Related Stories +

The Griffin Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Ne vile Velis
Motto Translation: Wishing nothing base.


The Myth-Busting History of Edna Griffin

Edna Griffin’s life’s work provides a powerful counter narrative to the traditional framing of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. She was a woman living in the North who used court cases, boycotts, sit-ins, and protests to improve her community starting well before 1954.

Through her decades of activism, she strategically employed a range of tactics from radical direct action to more moderate approaches rooted in a politics of respectability. She also made connections between racism and other social concerns like war, labor struggles, education, and criminal justice.

Brief Bio

Edna Griffin, born in Kentucky in 1909, grew up in predominantly white neighborhoods in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. She studied sociology at Fisk University where she met her husband, Stanley, and participated in several protests.

She marched against Mussolini’s invasion of Ethiopia and was arrested for joining teachers on strike. She also joined the Communist Party.

After living in several other cities, she and her husband moved to Des Moines, Iowa, in 1947 for Stanley to attend medical school. Within the first year of living in Des Moines, Griffin had her first of three children and was elected to leadership positions in the Iowa Progressive Party and the Des Moines branch of the Communist Party.

On July 7, 1948, Griffin, along with her one year-old daughter and two other African Americans, were denied service at Katz Drug Store when she ordered an ice cream soda. This wasn’t the first time Katz had denied service to African Americans and, after this particular incident, Griffin became involved in a decades-long struggle to desegregate the counter service by organizing boycotts and protests in downtown Des Moines. Griffin and others then became key players in two successful suits brought against Katz, one a criminal trial that fined Katz $50 (on Oct 7, 1948) and the other a civil suit in which an all-white jury found in favor of Griffin and awarded her $1 in damages (on Oct 15, 1949).

Griffin spent much of the rest of her life as a labor union, anti-war, and racial justice activist.

The FBI kept a file on Edna Griffin for 17 years as part of COINTELPRO (Counter Intelligence Program), a covert and often illegal surveillance program intended to infiltrate, discredit, and disrupt Left-leaning domestic political organizations. Griffin passed away in 2000.

Lesson

This lesson is designed to help students challenge the myths of the traditional narrative through the life story of Iowan Edna Griffin.


Griffin AS-13 - History

The USS S-47 (SS-158) was launched on 5 January 1924. The S-boat was commissioned on 16 September 1925 with Lieutenant John Wilkes in command.

The S-42 Class coastal submarine torpedo boat was 225 feet 3 inches in length overall had an extreme beam of 20 feet 8 inches had a normal surface displacement of 906 tons, and, when in that condition, had a mean draft of 16 feet. Submerged displacement was 1,126 tons. The hulls were riveted. The designed compliment was four officers and thirty-four enlisted men. The boat could operate safely to a depth of 200 feet. The submarine was armed with four 21-inch torpedo tubes…installed in the bow. Twelve torpedoes were carried. One 4-inch/50 caliber deck gun was installed. The full load of diesel oil carried was 46,363 gallons, which fueled two 600 designed brake horsepower Model 8-EB-15NR diesel engines manufactured by the New London Ship and Engine Company at Groton, Connecticut…which could drive the boat…via a diesel direct drive propulsion system…at 14.5 knots on the surface. Power for submerged propulsion was provided by a main storage battery, divided into two sixty-cell batteries, manufactured by the Electric Storage Battery Company (EXIDE) at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania…which powered two 750 designed brake horsepower main propulsion motors manufactured by the Electro Dynamic Company at Bayonne, New Jersey…which turned propeller shafts…which turned propellers…which could drive the submarine at 11 knots for a short period of time when operating beneath the surface of the sea. Slower submerged speeds resulted in greater endurances before the batteries needed to be recharged by the engines and generators.

Following commissioning and fitting out, USS S-47 (SS-158) conducted engineering and torpedo tests off the southern New England coast of the United States. However, with the new year, 1926, she departed the United States Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut, and transited south to join Submarine Division 19 in the Panama Canal Zone.

The submarine arrived at the submarine base at Coco Solo on 19 January 1926, and, for the next year and one-half, conducted local operations in the Pacific Ocean and in the Caribbean Sea. During this period, the submarine’s routine was broken up by joint Army-Navy exercises testing the defenses of the Canal by Fleet Problem VI (February 1926) and VII (March 1927) and by extended training cruises in the Caribbean Sea (June 1926 and April 1927). Transferred to San Diego, California, with her submarine division during June of 1927, she continued to participate in individual, division, fleet, and joint Army-Navy exercises into 1932. At that time, a period of inactivity in rotating reserve status was added to S-boat employment schedules.

In 1936, USS S-47, now in Submarine Division 11, was transferred back to Coco Solo, where she was based through the end of the decade. In the summer of 1941, the S-boat returned to the submarine base in Groton, Connecticut, and commenced operations off the southern New England coast. During September, the submarine patrolled in the Bermuda area and, in October, she returned to the Connecticut submarine base. The following month, the submarine moved north to Argentia, Newfoundland, Canada, to participate in exercises to test S-boat capabilities in arctic and sub-arctic waters.

On 7 December 1941, Japanese air and submarine units attacked targets in the Territory of Hawaii, thereby plunging the United States into the Second World War as an active participant.

By mid-December 1941, USS S-47 was back at Groton, Connecticut and, by January of 1942, the S-boat was back in the Panama Canal Zone.

Defensive operations in the approaches to the Panama Canal took USS S-47 into March. On the 5th of March 1942, the submarine moved west across the Pacific Ocean with Submarine Division 53 to join Task Force 42 at Moreton Bay, Brisbane, Australia. The S-boat arrived ‘down under’ in mid-April and, on the 22nd, she got underway to conduct her first offensive war patrol in the New Britain-New Ireland area.

On the 27th, she commenced submerged operations during daylight hours. On the morning of the 29th, she passed Bougainville and, on the night of 30 April, she arrived off New Britain. The next evening, she attempted to close an enemy submarine but lost contact with the target. That night, the S-boat transited Saint George Channel and, on the morning of 2 May, she closed Blanche Bay. Despite numerous enemy patrol craft, both surface and air, off the Crater Peninsula, she moved toward Simpson Harbor in an attempt to score on an oiler accompanied by a destroyer. Her quarry, however, reached safety before USS S-47 could close the range to within torpedo run distance.

USS S-47 waited outside the harbor. Four hours later, two destroyers entered the harbor and, a short while after that, a cruiser was sighted on the same course. USS S-47 increased her speed and maneuvered to attack. But, before she reached a firing position, a short in the electrical firing circuit fired the torpedo out of Number Four Torpedo Tube. The cruiser continued into the harbor. The electrical firing circuit in USS S-47 was disconnected.

Still in the area on the 3rd, USS S-47 became the target of a three-hour submarine hunt conducted by two destroyers and two minesweepers, who made frequent depth charge attacks. That night, the submarine cleared the area. By 5 May, she was off New Hanover and, on the 8th, she fired on a Japanese merchant ship, which reversed course and headed for the submarine at high speed. USS S-47 went deep and readied two torpedo tubes for firing. The target, however, passed overhead resumed its original course and soon outdistanced the submarine.

USS S-47 remained on patrol in that area for another four days. On the 12th, she shifted to the Buka area and patrolled off Queen Carola Harbor until 15 May. She then set course for Brisbane.

In port for repairs from 20 May until early June, USS S-47 cleared Moreton Bay on 6 June to return to New Britain. Again, she hunted off the Crater Peninsula, and between there and the Duke of York Islands then moved into the Shortland Island area before heading for Australia on the 22nd.

USS S-47 departed the Australian coast, again, on 28 July, but fuel tank leaks forced her to turn back on 1 August. From the 5th to the 24th, she underwent repairs in Brisbane. On the 25th, she was once more underway for Saint George Channel and the area to the northwest of Rabaul. On 2 September, her patrol was shifted to include the eastern and southeastern coasts of New Ireland, where, on the 12th, she damaged an enemy warship. On 22 September, the submarine returned to Moreton Bay, Brisbane, Australia.

Twenty-eight days later, USS S-47 departed Moreton Bay for her last war patrol as a unit of Task Force 42. Moving across the Coral Sea and into the Solomons, she sighted Shortland Island on the 28th, and, on the night of 30-31 October, commenced hunting on the Buin-Rabaul line. On 2 November, east of Bougainville, the submarine damaged a second Japanese warship. Two days later, she began moving southeast. On the 8th, she passed San Cristobal Island and departed the Solomons, en route to the Fiji Islands and the Panama Canal.

On 17 November, USS S-47 joined other units of Submarine Division 53 and submarine tender USS Griffin (AS-13) in Suva Harbor, whence the group proceeded to Coco Solo. There, during the first quarter of 1943, USS S-47 underwent overhaul and received a surface search radar. In March, the S-boat was ordered to Trinidad in the British West Indies to furnish training services for antisubmarine vessels stationed there. But she was soon recalled to the Panama Canal Zone then ordered to San Francisco, California, for further work on her at the Bethlehem Steel Company shipyard. Arriving in May, the submarine remained in the shipyard through the summer and, after training off the southern California coast in September, she headed north to the Aleutians.

In October, USS S-47 arrived at Dutch Harbor, Unalaska, whence she conducted two war patrols to impede Japanese traffic in the Paramushiro area. On 3 January 1944, she completed the second of her two North Pacific Ocean war patrols and, a month later, the S-boat departed the Aleutians to return to the southwestern Pacific Ocean.

Arriving at Milne Bay on 17 March, USS S-47 joined Task Force 72 and, for the next two months, conducted antisubmarine warfare (ASW) training operations for United States Seventh Fleet minesweepers. In June, however, she shifted to Seeadler Harbor in the Admiralties, whence she departed on another war patrol on 17 June. The patrol, conducted to support the Allied thrust along the New Guinea coast, was completed on 5 July. Availability at Brisbane followed and, at the end of August, the S-boat returned to Seeadler Harbor to resume ASW training operations. In November, she shifted to Mios Woendi and, during February of 1945, the submarine headed for Brisbane, whence, on 8 March, she commenced a transit to the west coast of the United States.

USS S-47 arrived at San Diego in mid-April and remained there until after the end of World War II hostilities…which officially occurred on 2 September 1945…when representatives of the Empire of Japan signed the instruments of surrender aboard battleship USS Missouri (BB-63), which was anchored in Tokyo Bay, Japan, for that occasion. In mid-September, the submarine moved up to San Francisco and, on 25 October 1945, USS S-47 was decommissioned. Her name was struck from the Navy List on 13 November 1945. Submarine Hull Number 158 was sold to a shipbreaker for scrapping during May of 1946.

USS S-47 (SS-158) was awarded three battle stars for her services during the Second World War.


Griffin AS-13 - History

Buford Jerome Stonehocker was born on May 7, 1917. According to our records Texas was his home or enlistment state and McLennan County included within the archival record. We have Waco listed as the city. He had enlisted in the United States Navy. Served during World War II. Stonehocker had the rank of Chief Petty Officer. His military occupation or specialty was Chief Motor Machinist's Mate. Service number assignment was 3808642. Attached to USS Hammerhead (SS-364). During his service in World War II, Navy Chief Petty Officer Stonehocker experienced a critical situation which ultimately resulted in loss of life on September 10, 1944 . Recorded circumstances attributed to: Died of intestinal obstruction, paralytic or spastic causes toxemia. Incident location: Fremantle, Australia, on board the submarine tender U.S.S. Griffin (AS-13).


Watch the video: BRAWL STARS ANIMATION - GRIFF ORIGIN (January 2022).