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Bullard DD- 660 - History

Bullard DD- 660 - History

Bullard

Born in Media, Pa., 6 December 1866, William Hannum Grubb Bullard graduated from the Academy in 1886. He served in Columbia (C-12) during the Spanish-American War and commanded Arkansa8 (BB-33), serving with the British Grand Fleet, during World War I. Ile was the author of a textbook for naval electricians and a member of the Inter-Allied Conference on Radio in 1919. He later served as Director of Communications, Navy Department. Rear Admiral Bullard retired in 1922 and died in Washington, D. C., 24 November 1927.

(DD-660: dp. 2050; 1. 376'5"; b. 39'7"; dr. 17'9"; s.
35.2 k.; cpl. 329; a. 5 5", 10 21" TT.; cl. Fletcher)

Bullard (DD-660) was launched 28 February 1943 by Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Kearny, N. J.; sponsored by Mrs. H. G. Bullard, widow of Rear Admiral Bullard; and commissioned 9 April 1943, Commander G. R. Hartwig in command.

After conducting brief operations along the eastern seaboard and in the Caribbean, Bullard proceeded to the Pacific, arriving at Pearl Harbor 29 August 1943. With the exception of one voyage to California (10 September 1944-18 February 1945) she operated constantly in forward areas of the Pacific rendering fire support, plane guard, patrol, and radar picket services. She participated in the Wake Island raid (54 October 1943) ; Rabaul strike (11 November) ; the invasion of Tarawa (19 Noveniber-I December) ; the occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls (22 January-March 1944) ; Admiralty Islands landings ( 30 March-13 April) Hollandia operation (16 April-4 May) ; seizure of Saipan and Guam (10 June-17 August) and the Okinawa operation (15 March-31 May 1945).

On 11 April 1945 during the Okinawa operation Bullard was slightly damaged by a Japanese suicide plane. Repairs completed at Okinawa, she departed 31 May and steamed to Leyte. Departing Leyte Gulf, 1 July, Bullard next participated in the 3d Fleet raids against Japan (10 July-15 August).

After the cessation of hostilities Bullard remained in the Far East engaged in occupation duties until 10 November 1945 when she departed for San Pedro, Calif., arriving 3 December. She operated along the west coast during most of 1946 and then reported to San Diego for inactivation. Bullard was placed out of commission in reserve 20 December 1946.

Bullard received nine battle stars for her World War 11 service.


Service history [ edit | edit source ]

After conducting brief operations along the eastern seaboard and in the Caribbean, Bullard proceeded to the Pacific, arriving at Pearl Harbor 29 August 1943. With the exception of one voyage to California (10 September 1944 – 18 February 1945) she operated constantly in forward areas of the Pacific rendering fire support, plane guard, patrol, and radar picket services. She participated in

  • the Wake Island raid (5–6 October 1943)
  • Rabaul strike (11 November)
  • the invasion of Tarawa (19 November – 1 December)
  • the occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls (22 January–March 1944)
  • Admiralty Islands landings (30 March – 13 April), operation (16 April – 4 May) and of Guam (10 June – 17 August) and
  • the Okinawa operation (15 March – 31 May 1945).

On 11 April 1945, during the Okinawa operation Bullard was slightly damaged by a Japanese kamikaze. Repairs completed at Okinawa, she departed on 31 May, and steamed to Leyte. Departing Leyte Gulf, 1 July, Bullard next participated in the 3rd Fleet raids against Japan (10 July – 15 August).

After the cessation of hostilities, Bullard remained in the Far East engaged in occupation duties until 10 November 1945, when she departed for San Pedro, Calif., arriving on 3 December. She operated along the west coast during most of 1946, and then reported to San Diego for inactivation. Bullard was placed out of commission in reserve on 20 December 1946.

Bullard was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 1 December 1972. She was sold on 3 December 1973 and broken up for scrap.


Contents

After conducting brief operations along the eastern seaboard and in the Caribbean, Bullard proceeded to the Pacific, arriving at Pearl Harbor 29 August 1943. With the exception of one voyage to California (10 September 1944 – 18 February 1945) she operated constantly in forward areas of the Pacific rendering fire support, plane guard, patrol, and radar picket services. She participated in

  • the Wake Island raid (5–6 October 1943) strike (11 November)
  • the invasion of Tarawa (19 November – 1 December)
  • the occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls (22 January–March 1944) landings (30 March – 13 April), operation (16 April – 4 May) and of Guam (10 June – 17 August) and
  • the Okinawa operation (15 March – 31 May 1945).

On 11 April 1945, during the Okinawa operation Bullard was slightly damaged by a Japanese kamikaze. Repairs completed at Okinawa, she departed on 31 May, and steamed to Leyte. Departing Leyte Gulf, 1 July, Bullard next participated in the 3rd Fleet raids against Japan (10 July – 15 August).

After the cessation of hostilities, Bullard remained in the Far East engaged in occupation duties until 10 November 1945, when she departed for San Pedro, Calif., arriving on 3 December. She operated along the west coast during most of 1946, and then reported to San Diego for inactivation. Bullard was placed out of commission in reserve on 20 December 1946.

Bullard was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 1 December 1972. She was sold on 3 December 1973 and broken up for scrap.


USS Bullard (DD 660)

Decommissioned 20 December 1946.
Stricken 1 December 1972.
Sold 3 December 1973 and broken up for scrap.

Commands listed for USS Bullard (DD 660)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1T/Cdr. Glenn Roy Hartwig, USN9 Apr 1943Nov 1943
2T/Cdr. Bernard William Freund, USNNov 194319 May 1945
3Lt.Cdr. Thomas Comins Hart, USN19 May 19451 Jun 1945
4Lt. Henry F. Rodner, USN1 Jun 194516 Jun 1945
5Eigel Thornton Steen, USN16 Jun 1945

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Notable events involving Bullard include:

30 Apr 1945
USS Iowa (Capt. J.L. Holloway, Jr., USN) topped off two of the destroyers of the Task Group, USS McCord (Cdr. F.D. Michael, USN) and USS Bullard (Cdr. B.W. Freund, USN), with fuel.

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DD-660 Bullard

Bullard (DD-660) was laid down 16 October 1942, launched 28 February 1943 by Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Kearny, N. J. sponsored by Mrs. H. G. Bullard, widow of Rear Admiral Bullard and commissioned 9 April 1943, Commander G. R. Hartwig in command.

After conducting brief operations along the eastern seaboard and in the Caribbean, Bullard proceeded to the Pacific, arriving at Pearl Harbor 29 August 1943. With the exception of one voyage to California (10 September 1944-18 February 1945) she operated constantly in forward areas of the Pacific rendering fire support, plane guard, patrol, and radar picket services. She participated in the Wake Island raid (5-6 October 1943) Rabaul strike (11 November) the invasion of Tarawa (19 November-1 December) the occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls (22 January-March 1944) Admiralty Islands landings (30 March-13 April), Hollandia operation (16 April-4 May) seizure of Saipan and Guam (10 June-17 August) and the Okinawa operation (15 March-31 May 1945).

On 11 April 1945 during the Okinawa operation Bullard was slightly damaged by a Japanese suicide plane. Repairs completed at Okinawa, she departed 31 May and steamed to Leyte. Departing Leyte Gulf, 1 July, Bullard next participated in the 3d Fleet raids against Japan (10 July-15 August).

After the cessation of hostilities Bullard remained in the Far East engaged in occupation duties until 10 November 1945 when she departed for San Pedro, Calif., arriving 3 December. She operated along the west coast during most of 1946 and then reported to San Diego for inactivation. Bullard was placed out of commission in reserve 20 December 1946. Stricken 1 December 1972, she was sold for scrap 3 December 1973.


USS Bullard DD-660 (1943-1946)

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Mục lục

Bullard được đặt lườn tại xưởng tàu của hãng Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co. ở Kearny, New Jersey vào ngày 16 tháng 10 năm 1942. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 28 tháng 2 năm 1943 được đỡ đầu bởi bà H. G. Bullard vợ góa Chuẩn đô đốc Bullard và nhập biên chế vào ngày 9 tháng 4 năm 1943 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Trung tá Hải quân G. R. Hartwig.

Sau khi hoàn tất đợt chạy thử máy ngắn dọc theo vùng bờ Đông và tại vùng biển Caribe, Bullard lên đường đi sang khu vực Mặt trận Thái Bình Dương, và đi đến Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 29 tháng 8 năm 1943. Ngoại trừ một chuyến đi đến California từ ngày 10 tháng 9 năm 1944 đến ngày 18 tháng 2 năm 1945, nó đã hoạt động liên tục tại khu vực tiền phương Mặt trận Thái Bình Dương trong các vai trò bắn hỏa lực hỗ trợ, canh phòng máy bay, tuần tra và cột mốc radar canh phòng.

Bullard đã tham gia cuộc bắn phá đảo Wake vào các ngày 5, 6 tháng 10 năm 1943 bắn phá Rabaul vào các ngày 11 tháng 11 chiếm đóng Tarawa từ ngày 19 tháng 11 đến ngày 1 tháng 12 chiếm đóng Kwajalein và Majuro từ ngày 22 tháng 1 đến tháng 3 năm 1944 đổ bộ lên quần đảo Admiralty từ ngày 30 tháng 3 đến ngày 13 tháng 4 đổ bộ lên Hollandia từ ngày 16 tháng 4 đến ngày 4 tháng 5 chiếm đóng Saipan và Guam từ ngày 10 tháng 6 đến ngày 17 tháng 8 và chiến dịch Okinawa từ ngày 15 tháng 3 đến ngày 31 tháng 5 năm 1945.

Đang khi hoạt động ngoài khơi Okinawa vào ngày 11 tháng 4 năm 1945, Bullard bị hư hại nhẹ do một cuộc tấn công Kamikaze tự sát của máy bay Nhật Bản. Sau khi được sửa chữa tại Okinawa, nó lên đường đi Leyte vào ngày 31 tháng 5, rồi khởi hành từ vịnh Leyte vào ngày 1 tháng 7 để tham gia các cuộc không kích cuối cùng của Đệ Tam hạm đội xuống chính quốc Nhật Bản từ ngày 10 tháng 7 đến ngày 15 tháng 8.

Sau khi Nhật Bản đầu hàng kết thúc xung đột, Bullard tiếp tục ở lại Viễn Đông để tham gia nhiệm vụ chiếm đóng cho đến ngày 10 tháng 11, khi nó lên đường quay trở về San Pedro, California, đến nơi vào ngày 3 tháng 12. Con tàu hoạt động dọc theo vùng bờ Tây trong phần lớn năm 1946, trước khi đi đến San Diego, California để chuẩn bị ngừng hoạt động nó được cho xuất biên chế vào ngày 20 tháng 12 năm 1946. Tên của Bullard được rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 1 tháng 12 năm 1972, và lườn tàu bị bán để tháo dỡ vào ngày 3 tháng 12 năm 1973.

Bullard được tặng thưởng chín Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II.


Lindberg USS Bullard DD660 in 1/125 scale

it is the old Blue Devill destroyer kit from Lindberg. I built her some forty years ago with a lot of modifications I've replaced the main mast radar, ranging fire radar, main guns , added guard rails , secondary mast , springs on 40mm guns and lot of small details all around. Paint are Humbrol medium sea grey and dark sea grey

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Bullard DD- 660 - History

Born in 1850 in Spring Hill, Tenn., William B. Caperton graduated from the Naval Academy in 1876. He held major posts ashore and afloat, chief of which were commanding the naval forces intervening in Haiti (1915-16) and Santo Domingo (1916), and Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Fleet, from 28 July 1916 to 30 April 1919. He served actively until 12 November 1921, and died in Newport, R.I., 12 December 1941.

(DD--650: dp. 2,060 1. 876'6"- b. 39'7" dr. 17'9" s. 36
k. cpl. 319 a. 5 5,', 10 21" tt., 6 dep., 2 act. cl.
Fletcher)

Caperton (DD-650) was launched 22 May 1943 by Bath Iron Works, Bath Maine sponsored by Miss M. Caperton and commissioned 30 July 1943, Commander W. J. Miller in command.

Caperton sailed from Boston 8 October 1943 for Pearl Harbor, where she arrived 6 November to begin the operations which would stamp her as one of the “fight ingest" destroyers of the Pacific theater. After delivering explosives at Funafuti, Ellice Islands, 28-29 November, the destroyer covered the Gilbert Islands through patrol until 8 January 1944, when she put back to Pearl Harbor. Here she joined the screen of mighty TF 58 with whom she steamed in the intensive series of operations which marked the advance of the Navy across the Pacific. On 30 January 1944, Caperton joined in the bombardment of Kwajalein, and from her base at Majuro, took part in the air strikes on Truk and Saipan in February.

Caperton cleared Espiritu Santo 16 March 1944 for the air operations covering the invasion of Emirau Island, then sailed for the stunning blows hurled from the air at the Japanese on Palau, Yap, Woleai, and Ulithi late in March. Tireless TF 68 continued the crescendo pace of its attacks, and in April Caperton screened air strikes preparatory to the invasion of Hollandia' saw the force's planes hit Truk once more, and blasted at Satawan and Ponape in shore bombardment.

On 6 June 1944, Caperton sortied from Majuro for the Marianas operation, which culminated in the fury of the Battle of the Philippine Sea on 19 and 20 June. Screening as the American carriers launched the strikes which would cripple Japanese naval aviation, Caperton interposed her blazing antiaircraft fire between enemy air attacks and the irreplaceable carriers. Moving on to cover the attacks preparatory to the return of United States forces to Guam, Caperton sailed close inshore to provide lifeguard services for carrier strikes and on 25 June braved the fire of enemy shore batteries to shell and sink a cargo ship in Apra Harbor. Through July, she operated in the Marianas, and late in the month screened air strikes on Yap and Palau.

Caperton got underway from Eniwetok 30 August 1944 to rendezvous with TF 38 for the well-planned bombardments and air strikes which paved the way for the return to the Philippines. The Palaus, Mindanao Visayas, and Luzon were blasted from the air, while Peleliu, Angaur, and the Ngesebus felt the might of the force's guns. The destroyer replenished at Ulithi, and resumed screening duty for the strikes intended to deny the Japanese the use of their bases on Okinawa and Formosa in the forthcoming Leyte invasion. In the 3 day Formosa air battle which resulted, Canberra (CA-70) and Houston (CL-81) were torpedoed from the air. Caperton was assigned to screen the cripples to safety, and to guard them while they were used as bait in the effort to bring the Japanese surface units into battle. When the stricken cruisers were safely out of range of enemy air attack, Caperton returned to screen TF 38 in the air strikes of the decisive Battle for Leyte Gulf. which developed from the all-out efforts of the Japanese to break up the Leyte landings. Strikes flown from the carriers of Caperton's group inflicted the final losses on the Japanese Center Force, and she with others pursued the retreating Japanese north, without making surface contact.

Continued operations supporting the invasion of the Philippines kept Caperton at sea from her base at Ulithi. When Reno (CL-96) was torpedoed on 4 November 1944 Caperton took her injured and other survivors on board and after weathering the furious typhoon of 18 December, she steamed for air strikes on Formosa Luzon, Camranh Bay, Hong Kong, Canton, and Okinawa.

An overhaul on the west coast prepared the destroyer for picket duty off Okinawa through May and June 1945 The desperate Japanese suicide air attacks made radar picket duty off embattled Okinawa one of the most dangerous duties of the war, but Caperton served her tour unscathed constantly vigilant both to protect herself and provide for effective use of her radar warning equipment.

On 29 June 1946, Caperton rejoined TF 38 for the final air strikes on the Japanese home islands, which continued until the close of the war. After several months of occupation duty at Tokyo, Caperton returned to the east coast of the United States, where she was decommissioned at Charleston, S.C., 6 July 1949.

The battle-tried veteran was recommissioned 6 April 1951, as the fleet was augmented to meet the threat posed by the Korean War. With Newport as her home port, Caperton operated locally until the fall of 1952, when she sailed to northern Europe for North Atlantic Treaty Organization Operation "Mainbrace." After preparing by fleet exercises in the Caribbean early in 1953, Caperton cleared Newport 27 April for the Panama Canal and duty in the Far East, arriving at Yokosuka, Japan 2 June for duty with TFs 77 and 95. With the first, she screened air strikes on Chinese and North Korean Communists with the second, she took part in the blockade and bombardment of Korea's coast. After further hunter-killer operations off Korea, she sailed on 9 October to call at the Philippines, Singapore, Colombo, Suez, Cannes, and Lisbon, thus rounding the world before her return to Newport 21 May 1954.
Five months of operations with North Atlantic Treaty Organization forces in northern Europe in 1954, and a good-will visit to Guayaquil, Ecuador, in 1955 highlighted a period of local operations and training which preceded Caperton's patrol operations in the Atlantic during the Suez crisis of November 1956. On 21 January 1957, Caperton sailed for a tour of duty with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean during which she sailed with the carrier striking force in the eastern Mediterranean during the Jordan crisis. Returning to Newport in June, the destroyer's next lengthy deployment was her participation from 3 September to 27 November in North Atlantic Treaty Organization Operation "Strikeback" in the North Atlantic and Mediterranean. Operations off the east coast, in the Caribbean with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean (including visits to Red Sea and Persian Gulf ports), and combined operations with Canadian forces continued through 1959. Caperton was placed out of commission in reserve at Norfolk, VA., on 27 April 1960.

Caperton received 10 battle stars for World War II service, and 1 for service in the Korean War.


Bullard DD- 660 - History

Morrison
(DD-660: dp. 2,050 1. 376'6" b. 39'8" dr. 17'9", s. 35 k. cpl. 273 a. 6 6 ', 10 40mm., 7 20mm., 8 21" tt., G dep., 2 det. cl. Fletcher)

Morrison (DD-660) was laid down by SeattleTacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle, Wash., 30 June 1942, Launched 4 July 1943 sponsored by Miss Margaret M. Morrison daughter of Coxswain Morrison and commissioned 18 December 1943, Comdr. Walter H. Price in command.

After shakedown off San Diego, Calif., Morrison departed Seattle 25 February 1944 for the South Pacific, via Pearl Harbor and the Marshalls. In mid-April the destroyer Joined TO 50.17 for screening operations off Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralties, during the fueling of carriers then striking Japanese installations in the Carolines.

Morrison returned to Pearl Harbor 9 May to train for the giant amphibious leap into the Marianas. Departing Pearl 31 May via Roi, Marshalls, she arrived east of Saipan 13 June for a busy month. Her accurate gunfire supported the initial landings the 15th and provided close fire support thereafter. With little aid the crew fought off night air attacks 17 through 19 June. Of 40 enemy planes that approached at dusk the 17th, only 15 got by the attacks of the Navy's carrier interceptor planes and Morrison shot down three of those.

On 2 August the destroyer rendezvoused off Guam with TG 68.4 for eight operations following the landings 21 July. Eight days later Morrison departed Guam for Eniwetok, Marshalls, where she remained from the 13th until she got underway 29 August for the Philippines, arriving off Mindanao the morning of 9 September. That same day, the beginning of a 2-day strike on Mindanao, a Japanese convoy of 50 sampans and freighters was sighted heading north Morrison led the intercepting force which destroyed the 10 to 15 sampans that survived the straflng by planes. She pushed on for airstrike operations on Peleliu, Palau the Carolines and Luson, Manila, and Samar Island, Philippines, through September.

On 2 October Morrison sailed with TG 83.3 for picket duty off Okinawa, during the airstrikes there and on other islands in the Ryukyus 10 October. She continued on screen and plane guard operations off Formosa and northern Luzon during a 5-day attack beginning the 12th On 16 October she screened Houston (CL-81) and Canberra (CA-70) as they retired to Ulithi.

During the Battle for Leyte Gulf, 23 to 26 October,Morrison operated off Luzon. On the 24th, she came to the aid of Princeton (CVL-23), badly hit by a Japanese bomb, and picked up approximately 400 survivors in an hour and a half. The destroyer then pulled alongside Princeton to assist in fighting fire, she had Just reached her position when the small aircraft carfier, drifting and rolling, wedged Morrison's mast and forward stack between her uptakes.Morrison managed to get clear and Birminpham (CW2) took her place. Ten minutes later the after third of Princeton blew off. Not only did Birmingham suffer topside damage and heavy casualties, but Princeton was then so badly damaged she had to be sunk by torpedoes.

Morrison debarked the Princeton survivors at Ulithi 27 October and got underway for the west coast' via Pearl Harbor, in company with Irwin (DD-794) and Birminpham, arriving San Francisco, Calif., 17 November. On 9 February the destroyer steamed back to the South Pacific, stopping at Pearl Harbor the 15th.

After shore bombardment exercises in the Hawaiian Islands, Morrison departed for Ulithi 3 March By 21 March she had Joined TF 54 underway for Okinawa out of Ulithi. The destroyer arrived off the southern shores of Okinawa the 25th, 7 days before the landings 1 April, and Joined in the preparations of bombardment

In the early morning of 31 March, after Stockton (DD-646) made a positive sound contact off Okluswa and expended her depth charges in the attack, Morrison arrived on the scene to see the submarine surface, then immediately submerge. She dropped a pattern of charges which seconds later forcing the sub to the surface where it was sunk by gunfire. At daylight Morrison',s small boats rescued the lone survivor

The ship continued shore bombardment, night illumination and screen operations off Oshima Beach. The night of li April Morrison assisted Anthony (DD-515) in illuminating and sinking enemy landing craft heading north along the beach.

Three days later Morrison began radar picket duty. Her first two stations, southwest of Okinawa, were occasionally raided at night. She replaced Daly (DD 519) at the third station 28 April after the other destroyer was hit by a kamikaze.

On 30 April Morrison was shifted to the most critical station on the picket line. After 3 days of bad weather had prevented air raids, the dawn of 4 May was bright, clear, and ominous. At 0715 the combat air patrol was called on to stop a force of about 25 planes headed toward Morrison but some got through.

The first attack on Morrison, a main target as flghter director ship, was a suicide run by a "Zeke." The plane broke through heavy flack to drop a bomb which splashed off the starboard beam and exploded harmlessly. Next a

Val" and another "Zeke" followed with unsuccessful suicide runs. About 0825 a "Zeke" approached through intense antiaircraft fire to crash into a stack and the bridge. The blow inflicted heavy casualties and knocked out most of the electrical equipment. The next three planes, all old twin-float biplanes, maneuvered, despite heavy attack, to crash into the damaged ship. With the fourth hit, Morrison, heavily damaged, began to list sharply to starboard.

Few communication circuits remained intact enough to transmit the abandon ship order. Two explosions occurred almost simultaneously, the bow lifted into the air, and by 0840 Morrison had plunged beneath the surface. The ship sank so quickly that most men below decks were lost, a total of 152.

In July 1957 the sunken hull of Morrison was donated along with those of some 26 other ships sunk in the Ryukyus area to the Government of the Ryukyu Islands for salvage.


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