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USS Pensacola CA-24 - History

USS Pensacola CA-24 - History

USS Pensacola CA-24

Pensacola III
(CA-24: dp. 9,100; 1. 586'8"; b. 65'3"; dr. 15'2"; s. 32 k.;
cpl. 653; a. 10 8", 4 5", 6 21" tt.; cl. Pensacola)

The third Pensacola (CA-24) was laid down by the New York Navy Yard 27 October 1926; launched 25 April 1929; sponsored by Mrs. Joseph L. Seligman; and commissioned 6 February 1930, Capt. Alfred G Howe in command.

Pensacola departed New York 24 March 1930 transited the Panama Canal to Callao, Peru, and Valparaiso Chile, before returning to New York 5 June. For the next four years she operated along the eastern seaboard and in the Caribbean Sea, several times transiting the Panama Canal for combined Fleet battle practice rang~ng from California to Hawaii.

Pensacola departed Norfolk 15 January 1935 to join thePacific Fleet arriving San Diego, her new home port, 30 January. Fleet problems ranged to Hawaii, one cruise took her to Alaska, and combined fleet maneuvers returned her briefly to the Caribbean Sea before she sailed 5 October 1939 to base at Pearl Harbor, arriving the 12th. Maneuvers frequently found the cruiser off Midway and French Frigate Shoals, and she made one voyage to Guam.

Pensacola departed Pearl Harbor 29 November 1941 with a convoy bound for Manila in the Philippines. After the infamous raid on Pearl Harbor, the convoy was deverted to Australia, entering Brisbane Harbor 7 January 1942. Pensacola returned to Pearl Harbor 19 January and put to sea 5 February to patrol the approaches to the Samoan Islands. On 17 February 1942 she rendezvoused off Samoa with Carrier Task Force 11, built around the aircraft carrier Lexington (CV-2).

Near Bougainville, Solomons, Pensacola's gunners helped repel two waves of Japanese bombors, 20 February. Not a ship of the carrier task force was damaged. Antiaireraft fire and Lezington Combat Air Patrol planes shot down 17 of the 18 attackers. One pilot, Lt. Edward H. O'Hare, destroyed five enemy planes in a gallant fight that made him the first Aee of the Navy in World War II and won him the Medal of Honor.

Pensacola continued to help guard Lezington on offensive patrol in the Coral Sea until carrier Yorktown joined the task force 6 March. The Ameriean ships steamed for the Gulf of Papua where 10 March Lexington launched planes for a surprise strike over the Owen Stanley mountains at Japanese shipping and installations at Salamana and Lae. A complete surprise, the raid caused heavy damage. The task force then turned toward Noumea, New Caledonia, to replenish. Pensacola patrolled with the Yorktown carrier task force until 8 April, then headed via Samoa for Pearl Harbor, arriving 21 April. She carried Marine Fighting Squadron 212 to Efate in the New Hebrides Islands and returned to Pearl Harbor with famed carrier Enterprise (CV-6) 26 May.

Pensacola departed Pearl Harbor 28 May with the Enterprise task force for a rendezous 2 June northeast of Midway with units of Task Force 17. Two days later, 4 June, when the Japanese armada came within range of the American carriers, the decisive Battle of Midway commenced.

Adm. Spruance's torpedo planes and dive-bombers attseked the Japanese carriers. Akagi and Kaya went up in flames, and Soryu was badly damaged. A fourth enemy carrier, Hiryu, still at large, launched strikes at Yorktown and the American flattops struck back, leaving the enemy carrier hit many times, in a mass of flames. Meanwhile, gallant Yorktown, hit by lhree bombs was fighting for her life. Pensacola raced from the Enterprise screen to aid the stricken carrier. Yorktown was dead in the water when Pensacola arrived, and the cruiser assisted in shooting down four enemy torpedo bombers during a second attack.

Despite all that could be done, Yorktown received two torpedo hits amidships and had to be abandoned. Pensacola rejoined the screen of Enterprise to pursue the retiring Japanese.

Pensacola returned to Pearl Harbor 13 June and, with Enterprise, again put to sea 22 June carrying 1,157 marines of Marine Aircraft Group 22 to Midway. She patrolled and trained in Hawaiian waters until 7 August. As Marines stormed the shores of Guadalcanal, the cruiser set course for the Solomons in the screen of carriers Saratoga (CV-3), Hornet (CV8) and Wasp (CV-7) to support the leathernecks in that bitter campaign. In submarine infested waters, torpedoes damaged Saratoga 31 August and sank Wasp 15 September

Pensacola arrived at Noumea, New Caledonia, 26 Septem ber and departed with carrier Hornet 2 October to strike the enemy in the Santa Isabel Guadalcanal area. On 24 October Hornet's carrier task group joined Enterprise and the combined force steamed to intercept enemy warships approaching the Guadalcanal-Tulagi area.

On 26 October 1942, search planes located a Japanese carrier and battleship formation, beginning the Battle of Santa Cruz Islands which was fought without contact being made between surface ships of the opposing forces. Air strikes inflieted severe bomb damage to Japanese carriers Zuiho and Shokoku, and sank Japanese cruiser Yura. Bomb hits damaged battleship Kirishima and other enemy ships.

Pensacola helped fight off a coordinated dive bombing and torpedo plane raid which damaged llorne! so severely that she had to be abandoned. Within minutes of the attack on Hornet 24 dive bombers dropped 23 bombs in a run on Enterprise (CV-6). Despite damage, the famed "Fighting Lady" launched a large number of planes from abandoned Hornet besides her own.

Pensacola received 55 officers and 133 men—survivors from Hornet whom she debarked at Noumea, 30 October 1942. The Task Force had turned baek a Japanese attempt to regain Guadalcanal, sunk cruiser Yura, and damaged a number of enemy capital ships. Japanese carriers had lost 123 planes.

Pensacola departed Noumea 2 November 1942 to guard transports landing Marine reinforcements, and supplies, at Aola Bay, Guadalcanal. She helped guard Enterprise during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal 12-13 November 1942. Planes from Enterprise assisted in the sinking of battleship Hiei, one cruiser, three destroyers, and eleven auxiliaries and the damaging of four Japanese cruisers and four destroyers.

Pensacola returned to Espiritu Santo to join cruiser-destroyer Task Force 67 under Rear Admiral Carleton H. Wright. On 29 November, the task force sailed to intercept a Japanese destroyer-transport force expected off Guadalcanal the next night. Just before midnight of the 30th, the American ships transited Lengo Channel and headed past Henderson Field on Guadalcanal as the Japanese task group steamed on a southerly course west of Savo Island to enter "Ironbottom Sound."

The two opposing task forces clashed in the Battle of Tassafaronga. American destroyers launched torpedoes as the enemy range eame within five miles of Pensacola's cruiser formation. Now gun flashes, tracers, and star shell candles stained the inky darkness. Japanese destroyer Takanami hit many times, was afire and exploding. American flagship Minneapolis (CA-36) took two torpedo hits that blasted her bow downward like an immense scoop and left her forecastle deck awash, but she continued to fight on. New Orleans (CA-32) next astern, closed the disabled Minneapolis and ran into the track of a torpedo that ripped off the forward part of the warship.

Pensacola turned left to prevent collision with two damaged American ships ahead of her. Silhouetted by the burning American cruisers, she eame in the Japanese line of fire. One of 18 torpedoes launched by Japanese destroyers hit her below the mainmast on the portside. Her engine room flooded three gun turrets went out of commission, and her oil tanks ruptured to make a soaked torch of her mast. Meantime Honolulu (CL-48) maneuvered radically at 30 knots, her guns continuing their rapid fire as she escaped the trap. But the last American cruiser in column, Northampton (CA-26), took two torpedo hits to duplicate on a larger scale the havoc inflieted on Pensacola.

The oil-fed flames engulfed Pensacola's main deek aft where torpedoes and machine gun ammunition exploded. Only

supreme effort and skillful damage control by her gallant men saved the ship. The fire, punctuated by the frightful explosion of 8-inch projectiles in her Number 3 turret, gradually subsided. Pensacola made steady progress towards Tulagi. She arrived there still aflame. After twelve hours the last fire was quenched. Her dead numbered 7 officers and 118 men. One officer and 67 men were injured.

Camouflaged as part of the island, Pensacola made repairs in Tulagi Harbor that enabled her to steam to Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides Island. She arrived there 6 December for emergeney repairs by tender Vestal until she sailed 7 January 1943 via tSamoa to Pearl Harbor, arriving 27 January.

On 8 November Pensacola sailed from Pearl Harbor in the screen of Southern Attack Force aircraft carriers. On 19 November Pensacola made bombardment runs on Betio and Tarawa. She rained 600 projectiles to put coast defense guns out of action, and destroyed enemy beach defenses and numerous buildings. As troops stormed ashore on Tarawa 20 November, the cruiser screened carriers launching air strikes supporting the landings. That night she fought off Japanese torpedo bombers and assisted torpedo-damaged carrier Independence (CVL-22) into Funafuti, Elliee Islands. For the next two months she ranged out of that base to screen carriers covering the movement of reinforcements and supplies to the Gilberts. On 29 January 1944 she began strikes and bombardments to destroy Japanese air power and shipping in the Marshall Islands. That night Pensacola helped bombard Tarao in the Eastern Marshalls. She then slammed shells into airfield runways, seaplane ramps, ammunition stowage areas and buildings on Wotje. She continued pounding these targets as Marines and Army troops landed 31 January to seize Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls. Invasion of the Marshall Islands continued 1 February as Marines occupied Roi and Namur Islands. Pensueola continued to hit hard at Tarao, Maloelap Atoll through 18 February, destroying coastal defenses and air bases of the enemy in the eastern Marshalls. Operating from Majuro and Kwajalein, she continued to patrol in approaches of the Marshalls. She again served in the screen of fast carriers conducting raids in the Carolines 30 March-1 April, against Japanese defenses at Palau, Yap, Ulithi and Woleai.

Pensacola departed Majuro 25 April sailing via Pearl Harbor and Mare Island for duty in the Northern Pacific, arriving in Kulak Bay 27 May. On 13 June, she joined her cruiserdestroyer task force in raining destruction on the airfields of Matsuwa, Iiuriles. In the early morning of 26 June she fired 300 8-inch projectiles to destroy shipping, airfields and installations at Kurabu Zaki, Paramushiru To, Kuriles, returning to Kulak Bay 28 June. Pensueola continued patrol in Alaskan waters until departing Kulak Bay 8 August for Hawaii.

Pensacola arrived Pearl Harbor 13 August and put to sea the 29th. Enroute to the Marianas 3 September, she joined an air-sea bombardment of Wake Island. On 9 October she pounded the main radio station and installations on Mareus Island. She and her sister cruisers and destroyers stirred up a fire melee in their "impersonation" of Halsey's 3rd Fleet to lead the Japanese into thinking the ladder of islands to the Bonins was next on the American timetable for invasion. Meanwhile Adm. Halsey's units advanced on the Philippines while Fast Carriers rained destruction on the enemy air and Fleet bases at Okinawa and Formosa.

Pensacola made rendezvous with the units of the Fast Carrier Task Force retiring from the great air battles over Formosa. After protecting hattle~amaged cruisers Canbe77a (CA-70) and Houston (CW81) to Ulithi, she joined a Fast Carrier Task Group including Wasp 16 October. The following day, troops supported by the 7th Fleet, began the liberation of the Philippine Islands.

Pensacola screened fast aircraft carriers striking Luzon and directly supported the invasion of Leyte beginning 20 October. She raced north to aid in the destruction of the enemy carrier force in the Battle of Cape Engaitio 25 October, then turned south as the fast carriers launched planes to aid the gallant escort carriers.

Pensocola bombarded Iwo Jima the night of 11-12 November and returned to Ulithi the 14th. As she was about to depart for Saipan 20 November, she spotted a periscope about 1,200 yards to starboard. As she maneuvered clear, destroyer Case (DD 370) rammed the enemy. Four minutes later her men witnessed the flaming explosion that destroyed fleet oiler Mississinewa (AO-59), victim of a Japanese midget submarine.

Pensacola arrived Saipan 22 November to prepare for the invasion of Iwo Jima. Five nights later, she helped splash several attacking Japanese aircraft. She departed Saipan 6 December, plastered Iwo Jima with 500 8-inch projectiles on the 8th. She returned to Iwo Jima on the 24th and the 27th pounding mountain gun positions, north of Suribachi Mountain. She hit defenses on Chichi Jima and Haha Jima as well as pounding mountain gun positions, north of Suirbachi Mountain. She hit defenses on Chi Jima and Haha Jima as well as Iwo Jima on 5 and 24 January 1945.

At Ulithi, 27 January, Pensacola formed with a battleshipcruiser-destroyer gunstrike task force under Rear Admiral B. J. Rodgers. Six battleships, four cruisers and a destroyer screen comprised the bombardment force which sailed 10 February via Tinian to Iwo Jima.

On 16 February Pensacola opened fire on the northwest sector of Iwo Jima to prepare for the landings. That afternoon Lt. (j.g.) Douglas W. Gandy, USNR piloting one of Pensacola's gun-spotter scout planes, shot down a Japanese fighter. The next morning Pensacola took six hits from enemy shore batteries as her guns covered operations of the minesweepers close inshore. Three of her officers and 14 men were killed. Another five officers and 114 men were injured.

Pensacola fired back as she retired for temporary repairs then returned to her bombardment station. The morning of 19 February she eommeneed harassing and counter-battery fire in direct support of the invasion landings. Her deadly guns fought day and night into 1 March when she silenced enemy shore batteries which had hit destroyer Terry (DD513) amidships. After helping Terry's wounded, she resumed direct bombardment support to advancing Marines that eontinued into 3 March.

She arrived in Ulithi 5 March and put to sea on the 20th to support the invasion and capture of Okinawa, the "last stepping stone" to Japan.

On 25 March Pensacola bombarded enemy defenses and covered the operations of minesweepers preparing the way for the Okinawa invasion landings. On 27 March she spotted a torpedo wake on her port quarter. A second "fish" streaked towards the ship from dead astern. As her 40-mm gunners opened fire on the torpedoes, Pensacola went hard left then hard right to parallel the deadly missiles. The first torpedo missed her starboard quarter by less than twenty feet. The second passed some twenty yards along the port side of the cruiser as her gunners opened with automatic weapons on a submarine periscope.

Pensacola gave direct bombardment support to the initial invasion of Okinawa 1 April and continued to blast at enemy targets until the 15th. She then sailed via Guam and Pearl Harbor for home. She arrived at Mare Island 7 May for overhaul.

She sailed 3 August for Adak, Alaska and was there when hostilities ended. On the 31st she sailed with units of Cruiser Division Five enroute to Ominato, Northern Honshu, Japan. She anchored in the outer harhor of On~inato 8 September.

Pensacola departed Ominato 14 November to embark 200 veterans at Iwo Jima, then touched Pearl Harbor enroute to San Franeiseo, Calif., arriving 3 December. Five days later she put to sea for Apra Harbor, Guam, where she embarked nearly 700 veterans for transport to San Diego, arriving 9 January 1946.

Pensacola departed San Pedro 29 April to stage with units of Joint Task Force One at Pearl Harbor in preparation for operation "Crossroads," the atomic bomb experiments at Bikini Atoll. She stood out of Pearl Harbor 20 May and reached Bikini the 29th to serve as a target ship. She survived the tests of 1 July and 25 July 1946. On 24 August 1946 she was taken in tow for Kwajalein where she decommissioned 26 August 1946. Her hulk was turned over to the custody of Joint Task Force One for radiological and structural studies. On eompletion of these studies, her hulk was sunk 10 November 1948.

Pensacola received thirteen battle stars for World War II service.


She was laid down by the New York Navy Yard on 27 October 1926, launched on 25 April 1929, sponsored by Mrs. Joseph L. Seligman, and commissioned on 6 February 1930, Captain Alfred G. Howe in command. [3]

Inter-war period

Pensacola departed New York on 24 March 1930, and transited the Panama Canal to Callao, Peru, and Valparaíso, Chile, before returning to New York on 5 June. For the next four years she operated along the eastern seaboard and in the Caribbean Sea, several times transiting the Panama Canal for combined Fleet battle practice ranging from California to Hawaii. [3]

Originally CL-24, effective 1 July 1931, Pensacola was redesignated CA-24 in accordance with the provisions of the London Naval Treaty of 1930.

Pensacola departed Norfolk on 15 January 1935, to join the Pacific Fleet arriving San Diego, her new home port, on 30 January. Fleet problems ranged to Hawaii, one cruise took her to Alaska, and combined fleet maneuvers returned her briefly to the Caribbean Sea before she sailed on 5 October 1939 to base at Pearl Harbor, arriving on the 12th. [3] Pensacola was one of six ships to receive the new RCA CXAM radar in 1940. [4] Maneuvers frequently found the cruiser off Midway and French Frigate Shoals, and she made one voyage to Guam. [3]

World War II

1941�

Pensacola departed Pearl Harbor on 29 November 1941, with the so-called "Pensacola Convoy", bound for Manila, in the Philippines. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, the convoy was diverted to Australia, entering Brisbane harbor on 22 December. Pensacola returned to Pearl Harbor on 19 January 1942, and put to sea on 5 February to patrol the approaches to the Samoan Islands. On 17 February 1942, she rendezvoused off Samoa with Carrier Task Force 11 (TF   11), built around Lexington. [3]

Near Bougainville Island, Pensacola ' s gunners helped repel two waves of Japanese bombers on 20 February. No ships were damaged. Anti-aircraft fire and Lexington Combat Air Patrol planes shot down 17 of the 18 attackers. [3]

Pensacola continued to help guard Lexington on offensive patrol in the Coral Sea until Yorktown joined the task force on 6 March. The American ships steamed for the Gulf of Papua where—on 10 March—Lexington launched planes for a surprise strike over the Owen Stanley Mountains at Japanese shipping and installations at Salamaua and Lae. A complete surprise, the raid caused heavy damage. The task force then turned toward Nouméa, New Caledonia, to replenish. Pensacola patrolled with Yorktown ' s task force until 8 April, then headed, via Samoa, for Pearl Harbor, arriving on 21 April. She carried Marine Fighting Squadron 212 (VMF-212) to Efate in the New Hebrides Islands and returned to Pearl Harbor with Enterprise on 26 May. [3]

Pensacola departed Pearl Harbor on 28 May with the Enterprise task force for a rendezvous on 2 June northeast of Midway with units of TF 17. Two days later, when the Japanese armada came within range of the American carriers, the battle of Midway commenced. [3]

Admiral Spruance's torpedo planes and dive-bombers attacked the Japanese carriers. Akagi and Kaga went up in flames, and Sōryū was badly damaged. A fourth enemy carrier—Hiryū, still at large—launched strikes at Yorktown and the American flattops struck back, leaving the enemy carrier hit many times, in a mass of flames. Meanwhile, Yorktown—hit by three bombs—was fighting for her life. Pensacola raced from Enterprise′s screen to aid the stricken carrier. While trying to assist Yorktown, the ship was struck with a torpedo and hit in the galley. Yorktown was dead in the water when Pensacola arrived, and the cruiser assisted in shooting down four enemy torpedo bombers during a second attack. [3]

Despite all that could be done, Yorktown received two torpedo hits amidships and had to be abandoned. Pensacola rejoined the screen of Enterprise to pursue the retiring Japanese. [3]

Pensacola returned to Pearl Harbor on 13 June and—with Enterprise—again put to sea on 22 June, carrying 1,157 marines of Marine Aircraft Group 22 (MAG   22) to Midway. She patrolled and trained in Hawaiian waters until 7 August. As Marines stormed the shores of Guadalcanal, the cruiser set course for the Solomons in the screen of Saratoga, Hornet and Wasp to support the leathernecks in that bitter campaign. In submarine-infested waters, torpedoes damaged Saratoga on 31 August and sank Wasp on 15 September. [3]

Pensacola arrived at Nouméa, New Caledonia on 26 September, and departed with Hornet on 2 October to strike the enemy in the Santa Isabel–Guadalcanal area. On 24 October, Hornet′s task group joined Enterprise and the combined force steamed to intercept enemy warships approaching the Guadalcanal-Tulagi area.

On 26 October, search planes located a Japanese carrier and battleship formation, beginning the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands which was fought without contact being made between surface ships of the opposing forces. Air strikes inflicted severe bomb damage to Zuihō and Shōkaku, and sank Yura. Bomb hits damaged Kirishima and other enemy ships. [3]

Pensacola helped fight off a coordinated dive bombing and torpedo plane raid which damaged Hornet so severely that she had to be abandoned. Within minutes of the attack on Hornet, 24 dive bombers dropped 23 bombs in a run on Enterprise. Despite damage, the famed "Fighting Lady" launched a large number of planes from Hornet besides her own. [3]

Pensacola received 188 survivors from Hornet, whom she debarked at Nouméa on 30 October 1942. The task force had turned back a Japanese attempt to regain Guadalcanal, sunk Yura, and damaged a number of enemy capital ships. Japanese carriers lost 123 planes. [3]

Pensacola departed Nouméa on 2 November to guard transports landing Marine reinforcements, and supplies, at Aola Bay, Guadalcanal. She helped guard Enterprise during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal on 12󈝹 November. Planes from Enterprise assisted in the sinking of Hiei, one cruiser, three destroyers, and eleven auxiliaries, and the damaging of four cruisers and four destroyers. [3]

Battle of Tassafaronga

Pensacola returned to Espiritu Santo to join TF 67 under Rear Admiral Carleton H. Wright. On 29 November, TF   67 sailed to intercept a Japanese destroyer-transport force expected off Guadalcanal the next night. Just before midnight of the 30th, the American ships transited Lengo Channel and headed past Henderson Field on Guadalcanal as the Japanese task group steamed on a southerly course west of Savo Island to enter "Ironbottom Sound". [3]

The two opposing task forces clashed in the Battle of Tassafaronga. American destroyers launched torpedoes as the enemy range came within 5   mi (4.3   nmi 8.0   km ) of Pensacola′s cruiser formation. Now gun flashes, tracers, and star shell candles stained the inky darkness. Takanami—hit many times—was afire and exploding. Minneapolis took two torpedo hits that blasted her bow downward like an immense scoop and left her forecastle deck awash, but she continued to fight on. New Orleans closed on Minneapolis, and ran into the track of a torpedo that ripped off the forward part of the warship. [3]

Pensacola turned left to prevent collision with two damaged American ships ahead of her. Silhouetted by the burning American cruisers, she came into the Japanese line of fire. One of 18 torpedoes launched by Japanese destroyers hit her below the mainmast on the portside. Her engine room flooded, three gun turrets went out of commission, and her oil tanks ruptured to make a soaked torch of her mast. Meantime, Honolulu maneuvered radically at 30   kn (35   mph 56   km/h) , her guns continuing their rapid fire as she escaped the trap. The last American cruiser in column—Northampton—took two torpedo hits to duplicate on a larger scale the havoc inflicted on Pensacola. [3]

The oil-fed flames engulfed Pensacola ' s main deck aft where ammunition exploded. Only supreme effort and skillful damage control by her men saved the ship. The fire—punctuated by the frightful explosion of 8-inch projectiles in her Number 3 turret—gradually subsided. Pensacola made steady progress toward Tulagi. She arrived there still aflame. After 12 hours the last fire was quenched. Her dead numbered seven officers and 118 men. One officer and 67 men were injured. [3]

1943�

Camouflaged as part of the island, Pensacola made repairs in Tulagi Harbor that enabled her to steam to Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides Island. She arrived there on 6 December for emergency repairs by Vestal until she sailed on 7 January 1943 via Samoa to Pearl Harbor, arriving on 27 January. [3]

Sister ships Salt Lake City and Pensacola, with New Orleans (L to R), at Pearl Harbor in 1943

On 8 November, Pensacola sailed from Pearl Harbor in the screen of Southern Attack Force aircraft carriers. On 19 November, Pensacola made bombardment runs on Betio and Tarawa. She rained 600 projectiles to put coast defense guns out of action, and destroyed enemy beach defenses and numerous buildings. As troops stormed ashore on Tarawa on 20 November, the cruiser screened carriers launching air strikes supporting the landings. That night, she fought off Japanese torpedo bombers and assisted Independence into Funafuti, Ellice Islands. For the next two months, she ranged out of that base to screen carriers covering the movement of reinforcements and supplies to the Gilberts. On 29 January 1944, she began strikes and bombardments to destroy Japanese air power and shipping in the Marshall Islands. That night, Pensacola helped bombard Taroa in the Eastern Marshalls. She then slammed shells into airfield runways, seaplane ramps, ammunition stowage areas and buildings on Wotje. She continued pounding these targets as Marines and Army troops landed on 31 January to seize Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls. The invasion of the Marshall Islands continued on 1 February as Marines occupied Roi and Namur Islands. Pensacola continued to hit hard at Taroa, Maloelap Atoll through 18 February, destroying coastal defenses and air bases of the enemy in the eastern Marshalls. Operating from Majuro and Kwajalein, she continued to patrol in approaches of the Marshalls. She again served in the screen of fast carriers conducting raids in the Caroline Islands (30 March𔂿 April), against Japanese defenses at Palau, Yap, Ulithi and Woleai. [3]

Pensacola departed Majuro on 25 April sailing via Pearl Harbor and Mare Island for duty in the Northern Pacific, arriving in Kulak Bay on 27 May. On 13 June, she joined her cruiser-destroyer task force in raining destruction on the airfields of Matsuwa, Kuriles. In the early morning of 26 June, she fired 300 8-inch projectiles to destroy shipping, airfields and installations at Kurabu Zaki, Paramushiru To, Kuriles, returning to Kulak Bay on 28 June. Pensacola continued patrol in Alaskan waters until departing Kulak Bay on 8 August for Hawaii. [3]

Pensacola arrived Pearl Harbor on 13 August and put to sea on the 29th. En route to the Marianas on 3 September, she joined an air-sea bombardment of Wake Island. On 9 October, she pounded the main radio station and installations on Marcus Island. She and her sister cruisers and destroyers stirred up a fire melee in their "impersonation" of Halsey's 3rd Fleet to lead the Japanese into thinking the ladder of islands to the Bonins was next on the American timetable for invasion. Meanwhile, Adm. Halsey's units advanced on the Philippines while Fast Carriers rained destruction on the enemy air and Fleet bases at Okinawa and Formosa. [3]

Pensacola made rendezvous with the units of the Fast Carrier Task Force retiring from the great air battles over Formosa. After escorting Canberra and Houston to Ulithi, she joined a Fast Carrier Task Group—including Wasp—on 16 October. The following day, troops supported by the 7th Fleet began the liberation of the Philippine Islands. [3]

Pensacola screened fast aircraft carriers striking Luzon and directly supported the invasion of Leyte beginning on 20 October. She raced north to aid in the destruction of the enemy carrier force in the battle off Cape Engaño on 25 October, then turned south as the fast carriers launched planes to aid the gallant escort carriers. [3]

Pensacola bombarded Iwo Jima on the night of 11/12 November and returned to Ulithi the 14th. As she was about to depart for Saipan on 20 November, she spotted a periscope about 1,200   yd (1,100   m) to starboard. As she maneuvered clear, Case rammed the enemy. Four minutes later, her men witnessed the flaming explosion that destroyed Mississinewa, victim of a Japanese kaiten midget submarine. [3]

Pensacola arrived Saipan on 22 November to prepare for the invasion of Iwo Jima. Five nights later, she helped splash several attacking Japanese aircraft. She departed Saipan on 6 December, plastering Iwo Jima with 500 8-inch projectiles on the 8th. She returned to Iwo Jima on the 24th and 27th, pounding mountain gun positions north of Suribachi Mountain. She hit defenses on Chichi Jima and Haha Jima as well as Iwo Jima on 5 January and 24 January 1945. [3]

At Ulithi on 27 January, Pensacola formed with a battleship-cruiser-destroyer gunstrike task force under Rear Admiral B. J. Rodgers. Six battleships, four cruisers and a destroyer screen comprised the bombardment force which sailed on 10 February via Tinian to Iwo Jima. [3]

On 16 February, Pensacola opened fire on the northwest sector of Iwo Jima to prepare for the landings. That afternoon, Lieutenant Douglas W. Gandy, USNR—piloting one of Pensacola ' s OS2U Kingfisher floatplanes—shot down a Japanese fighter. The next morning, Pensacola took six hits from enemy shore batteries as her guns covered operations of the minesweepers close inshore. Three of her officers and 14 men were killed. Another five officers and 114 men were injured. [3]

Pensacola fired back as she retired for temporary repairs then returned to her bombardment station. The morning of 19 February she commenced harassing and counter-battery fire in direct support of the invasion landings. Her deadly guns fought day and night into 1 March when she silenced enemy shore batteries which had hit Terry amidships. After helping Terry′s wounded, she resumed direct bombardment support to advancing Marines that continued into 3 March. [3]

She arrived in Ulithi on 5 March, and was assigned to Task Force 54 (TF 54). They put to sea on the 20th to support the invasion Okinawa, the "last stepping stone" to Japan. [3]

On 25 March, Pensacola bombarded enemy defenses and covered the operations of minesweepers preparing the way for the Okinawa invasion landings. On 27 March, she spotted a torpedo wake on her port quarter. A second "fish" streaked toward the ship from dead astern. As her 40   mm gunners opened fire on the torpedoes, Pensacola went hard left then hard right to parallel the deadly missiles. The first torpedo missed her starboard quarter by less than 20   ft (6.1   m) . The second passed some 20   yd (18   m) along the port side of the cruiser as her gunners opened with automatic weapons on a submarine periscope. [3]

Pensacola gave direct bombardment support to the initial invasion of Okinawa on 1 April and continued to blast at enemy targets until the 15th. She then sailed via Guam and Pearl Harbor for home. She arrived at Mare Island on 7 May for overhaul. [3]

She sailed on 3 August for Adak, Alaska, and was there when hostilities ended. On the 31st, she sailed with units of Cruiser Division Five en route to Ominato, Northern Honshū, Japan. She anchored in the outer harbor of Ominato on 8 September. [3]

Post-war

Pensacola departed Ominato on 14 November to embark 200 veterans at Iwo Jima, then touched Pearl Harbor en route to San Francisco, California, arriving on 3 December. Five days later, she put to sea for Apra Harbor, Guam, where she embarked nearly 700 veterans for transport to San Diego, arriving on 9 January 1946. [3]

Operation Crossroads

Pensacola departed San Pedro on 29 April to stage with units of Joint Task Force One at Pearl Harbor in preparation for Operation Crossroads, the atomic bomb experiments at Bikini Atoll. She stood out of Pearl Harbor on 20 May, and reached Bikini on the 29th to serve as a target ship. She survived the tests of 1 July and 25 July. On 24 August, she was taken in tow for Kwajalein where she decommissioned on 26 August. Her hulk was turned over to the custody of Joint Task Force One for radiological and structural studies. On completion of these studies, her hulk was sunk on 10 November 1948 [3] off the Washington coast. [5]


PENSACOLA CA 24

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Pensacola Class Light Cruiser
    Keel Laid 27 October 1926 - Launched 25 April 1929

Naval Covers

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Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


Compatible Upgrades

Performance

Pensacola is the first heavy cruiser in the American cruiser branch, though "heavy" in this case refers strictly to her 8-inch guns and not to any sort of durability. The pathetically light armor of Pensacola makes her one of the more difficult-to-play cruisers of Tier VI, given her tendency to take heavy penetrating and citadel hits at all angles. Additionally, due to her slow turret traverse — as slow as some battleships — it can be very difficult to keep track of targets at closer ranges and react quickly enough to enemies showing broadside. A stand-up fight in Pensacola against anything larger than a cruiser will likely end in a Pyrrhic victory at best.. and an instant demise at worst. Therefore, it is advised to use her high ballistic arcs to fire over small islands and not show broadside to battleships or even cruisers.

She may be fragile, but Pensacola packs a wallop. She boasts ten 203mm rifles at a tier that cruisers of most other nations are still bringing 150 or 152mm ones. Only Japanese counterpart Aoba packs guns this large, while German Premium Graf Spee goes even larger (at 283mm). Combined with the improved normalization of her armor-piercing shells, Pensacola is an extreme threat to the majority of the cruisers in her matchmaking bracket, and her HE shells are heavy enough to punish any destroyers she meets and reliably burn battleships she encounters. Pensacola has the rudder shift time to actively dodge incoming fire and medium and long range in the hands of an attentive captain who knows how to handle her, she is deadly.

  • Excellent main battery guns Pensacola boasts good firing angles for all ten guns and great AP penetration capabilities.
  • Good anti-aircraft armament lacks the range of American light cruiser counterpart Dallas, but makes up for it with more mid-range power.
  • Outstanding maneuverability and handling characteristics.
  • Decent armor Pensacola can take shells 14 inches or lower, but can still be citadel.
  • Poor large caliber AA range and damage.
  • Very slow turret traverse, almost as slow as Fuso.
  • Poor concealment has the same base concealment as same tier American battleship New Mexico.
  • Second slowest rate of fire of all Tier VI cruisers, only Admiral Graf Spee has a slower rate of fire.

Research

Availability of researchable upgrades for Pensacola is as follows:

  • Hull: Upgrade to Hull (B) for slightly more hitpoints, more anti-air capabilities, and better rudder shift time. Research of this module unlocks progression to New Orleans.
  • Gun Fire Control System: Upgrade to Mk6 mod. 2 for an extra 10% range on the main battery.


PENSACOLA LSD 38

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Anchorage Class Dock Landing Ship
    Keel Laid March 12 1969 - Launched July 11 1970

Struck from Naval Register September 30 1999

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel

Established: In the Department of the Navy by an act of May 13, 1942 (56 Stat. 276).

Predecessor Agencies:

In the War Department:

In the Department of the Navy:

  • Office of the Secretary of the Navy (personnel functions, 1798-1862)
  • Board of Navy Commissioners (personnel functions, 1815-42)
  • Office of Detail (1861-89)
  • Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting (personnel functions, 1862-89)
  • Bureau of Navigation (personnel functions, 1889-1942)

Functions: Exercises oversight responsibility for the Naval Military Personnel Command, Navy Recruiting Command, and Naval Civilian Personnel Center. Administers all personnel matters for the U.S. Navy.

Finding Aids: Virgil E. Baugh, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, PI 123 (1960) Lee D. Saegesser and Harry Schwartz, comps., "Supplement to Preliminary Inventory No. 123, Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel," NM 74 (Jan. 1967) supplement in National Archives microfiche edition of preliminary inventories.

Security-Classified Records: This record group may include material that is security-classified.

Related Records: Record copies of publications of the Bureau of Naval Personnel in RG 287, Publications of the U.S. Government.

24.2 GENERAL RECORDS OF THE BUREAU OF NAVAL PERSONNEL AND ITS PREDECESSORS
1801-1966

History: War Department, established by act of August 7, 1789 (1 Stat. 49), handled personnel functions for the U.S. Navy until a separate Department of the Navy was established by act of April 30, 1798 (1 Stat. 553). Personnel duties centralized in the immediate office of the Secretary of the Navy, 1798-1862, assisted by the Board of Navy Commissioners, established by act of February 7, 1815 (3 Stat. 202), and abolished by act of August 31, 1842 (5 Stat. 579). Responsibility for detailing (assigning) officers delegated to Office of Detail, 1861 (SEE 24.4). Responsibility for enlisting and recruiting navy personnel assigned to Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting, 1862 (SEE 24.5). Personnel functions of Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting transferred to Bureau of Navigation, 1889. Bureau of Navigation redesignated Bureau of Naval Personnel, 1942. SEE 24.1.

24.2.1 Correspondence

Textual Records: Letters sent to the President, Congressmen, and Executive departments, 1877-1911 the Secretary of the Navy, naval establishments, and officers, 1850-1911 commandants, 1862- 1911 and enlisted personnel and apprentices, 1864-1911. Letters sent concerning civilian personnel, 1903-9 and aviation, 1911- 12. General letters sent, 1885-96. Miscellaneous letters sent, 1862-1911. Letters received, 1862-89. General correspondence (6,043 ft.), 1889-1945, with record cards, 1903-25 subject cards, 1903-45 and history cards, 1925-42. Indexes and registers of letters sent and received, and of general correspondence, 1862-1903. Correspondence relating to vessels, personnel, and naval activities, 1885-1921.

Textual Records: Logs of U.S. naval ships and stations, 1801-1946 (72,500 vols., 8,060 ft.), and 1945-61 (12,000 vols., 6,980 ft.) with indexes and lists, 1801-1940. Microfilm copy of log of U.S.S. Constitution, 1813-15 (1 roll). Logs of the German merchant vessels Prinz Waldemar and Prinz Sigismund, 1903-14. Communication logs and signal record books, 1897-1922. Signal logs and codebooks, 1917-19. Operational and signal logs of U.S. Navy armed guard units aboard merchant vessels, 1943-45. Manuscript ("rough") log and night order book of the U.S.S. Missouri, 1944-45.

Microfilm Publications: M1030.

Finding Aids: Claudia Bradley, Michael Kurtz, Rebecca Livingston, Timothy Mulligan, Muriel Parseghian, Paul Vanderveer, and James Yale, comps., List of Logbooks of U.S. Navy Ships, Stations, and Miscellaneous Units, 1801-1947, SL 44 (1978).

24.2.3 Muster rolls

Textual Records: Muster rolls of ships, 1860-1900 and ships and stations, 1891-1900. Muster rolls of ships and shore establishments, 1898-1939. Civil War muster rolls, 1861, 1863. Microfilm copies of muster rolls of ships, stations, and other naval activities, 1939-71 (25,279 rolls), with indexes.

24.2.4 Records of units attached to the Bureau of Navigation

Textual Records: Letters sent by the Signal Office, 1869-86. Records of the Coast Signal Service, 1898, consisting of correspondence regarding the establishment of signal stations headquarters correspondence correspondence of district headquarters with signal stations letters sent and correspondence of the First District Office, Boston, MA (in Boston), Second District Office, New York, NY (in New York), Third District Office, Norfolk, VA (in Philadelphia), Fourth District Office, Charleston, SC (in Atlanta), Fifth District Office, Jacksonville, FL (in Atlanta), Sixth District Office, Pensacola, FL (in Atlanta), and Seventh District Office, New Orleans, LA (in Fort Worth) and vessel movement telegrams. Personnel jackets of applicants for and appointees to the Board of Visitors of the U.S. Naval Academy, 1910-13.

24.2.5 Other records

Textual Records: Annual reports of the Chief of the Bureau of Navigation, 1897-1904. Naval militia bills, 1909-10. Applications and registers of employees, 1861-1915. Records showing complements of ships and shore units, 1891-1913. Watch, quarter, and station billbooks, 1887-1911.

24.3 RECORDS RELATING TO NAVAL OFFICERS, ENLISTED MEN, AND APPRENTICES
1798-1943

24.3.1 Records relating to naval officers

Textual Records: Application, examination, and appointment records, 1838-1940. Commissions and warrants, 1844-1936. Orders and related records, 1883-1903. Identification, 1917-21, and age, 1862-63, certificates. Registers, rosters, and records showing complements, 1799-1909. Personnel jackets and other records, 1900-25, including a microfilm copy of index to officers' jackets (2 rolls). Service records, 1798-1924. Miscellaneous records, 1863-92.

Microfilm Publications: M330, T1102.

Photographs (5,483 images): Navy and Marine Corps commissioned and non-commissioned officers and their families, 1904-38 (P, PP, PA, PB, PC, PD). SEE ALSO 24.12.

24.3.2 Records relating to enlisted men

Textual Records: Records, 1885-1941, relating to enlisted men who served between 1842 and 1885 (340 ft.). Correspondence jackets for enlisted men, 1904-43. Microfilm copy of an index to rendezvous reports, muster rolls, and other personnel records, 1846-84 (67 rolls). Registers and lists of recruits, 1861-73. Enlistment returns, changes, and reports, 1846-1942. Continuous service certificates, 1865-99. Records concerning discharges and desertions, 1882-1920.

Microfilm Publications: T1098, T1099, T1100, T1101.

24.3.3 Records relating to naval apprentices

Textual Records: Certificates of consent for minors, 1838-67. "Apprentice papers," 1864-89. Journal of enlistments, U.S.S. Allegheny, 1865-68. General record of apprentices, U.S.S. Portsmouth, 1867-68. Records relating to apprentices and apprentice training methods, U.S.S. Sabine, 1864-68. Register of enlistments, 1864-75.

24.4 RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF DETAIL
1865-90

History: Established in Office of the Secretary of the Navy, March 1861, to handle assignment and detailing of officers. Placed under Bureau of Navigation, April 28, 1865. Reverted to Office of the Secretary by General Order 322, Department of the Navy, October 1, 1884. Restored to Bureau of Navigation by General Order 337, Department of the Navy, May 22, 1885. Absorbed by Bureau of Navigation and superseded by Division of Officers and Fleet (SEE 24.6.4) pursuant to Navy Department reorganization, effective June 30, 1889, by General Order 372, Department of the Navy, June 25, 1889.

Textual Records: Letters sent, 1865-90. Letters received, 1865- 86, with registers, 1865-90.

24.5 RECORDS OF THE BUREAU OF EQUIPMENT AND RECRUITING
1856-1928 (bulk 1862-89)

History: Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting established by an act of July 5, 1862 (12 Stat. 510), as one of three bureaus created to supersede the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair, one of the original Navy Department bureaus established by the act abolishing the Board of Navy Commissioners (5 Stat. 579), August 31, 1842. Initially responsible for recruiting and equipping officers, managing naval enlisted personnel and, after 1875, directing the apprentice training system. Acquired responsibility for supervision of the Naval Observatory, Nautical Almanac Office, Office of the Superintendent of Compasses, and Office of the Inspector of Electrical Appliances in an exchange of functions with the Bureau of Navigation (SEE 24.6) in the Navy Department reorganization of June 30, 1889, by General Order 372, Navy Department, June 25, 1889. Acquired Hydrographic Office from Bureau of Navigation by General Order 72, Department of the Navy, May 9, 1898, implementing an act of May 4, 1898 (30 Stat. 374). Redesignated Bureau of Equipment by the Naval Services Appropriation Act (26 Stat. 192), June 30, 1890. Functionally abolished by redistribution of responsibilities pursuant to an act of June 24, 1910 (36 Stat. 613), effective June 30, 1910. Formally abolished by act of June 30, 1914 (38 Stat. 408).

Textual Records: Letters sent to the Secretary of the Navy, 1862- 85 the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, 1865-85 the Commissioner of Pensions, 1871-85 the Superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy, 1865-83 and china, glass, and plated ware manufacturers, 1869-82. General letters sent, 1865-89. Letters sent to commanders of squadrons and naval forces, 1865-83 and commandants of navy yards and stations and other officers, 1862- 85. Letters received from the Secretary of the Navy, 1862-85 the Fourth Auditor and Second Comptroller of the Treasury, 1865-86 and the Commissioner of Pensions, 1882-85. Letters received from officers, 1862-85 and commandants of navy yards, 1862-85. Miscellaneous letters received, 1862-85, 1889-92. Indexes and registers of letters sent and received, 1862-90. Conduct reports and shipping articles, 1857-1910. Records of discharges and desertions, 1856-89. Continuous service certificates and records of merit awards, 1863-1928. Records relating to naval apprentices, 1880-86. Record of vessel complements, n.d.

Related Records: Records of the Bureau of Equipment in RG 19, Records of the Bureau of Ships.

24.6 RECORDS OF THE BUREAU OF NAVIGATION
1804-1946

History: Established in the reorganization of the Navy Department under authority of an act of July 5, 1862 (12 Stat. 510), as one of three bureaus created to supersede the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair, one of the original Navy Department bureaus established by the act abolishing the Board of Navy Commissioners (5 Stat. 579), August 31, 1842. Initially responsible for providing nautical charts and instruments and for supervising the Naval Observatory, Hydrographic Office, and Nautical Almanac Office. Acquired personnel responsibilities in an exchange of functions with the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting (SEE 24.5) in the Navy Department reorganization of June 30, 1889, by General Order 372, Navy Department, June 25, 1889.

Assigned to newly established Division of Personnel in Navy Department reorganization pursuant to Changes in Navy Regulations No. 6, November 18, 1909. Restored to autonomous bureau status upon abolishment of Division of Personnel by Changes in Navy Regulations and Navy Instructions No. 1, April 25, 1913. Renamed Bureau of Naval Personnel, 1942. SEE 24.1.

Hydrographic Office formally transferred to Bureau of Equipment, successor to Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting, by General Order 72, Department of the Navy, May 9, 1898, implementing an act of May 4, 1898 (30 Stat. 374). Hydrographic Office and Naval Observatory (which had absorbed the Nautical Almanac Office, 1894, and the Office of the Superintendent of Compasses, 1906) returned to Bureau of Navigation, July 1, 1910, pursuant to an act of June 24, 1910 (36 Stat. 613), dispersing the functions of the Bureau of Equipment (SEE 24.5). Transferred to Office of the Chief of Naval Operations by EO 9126, April 8, 1942.

24.6.1 Records of the Chaplains Division

History: Established 1917 to centralize administration of expanded force of navy chaplains.

Textual Records: Correspondence, 1916-40. Biographical data about chaplains, 1804-1923. Miscellaneous records, 1898-1946.

Sound Recordings (1 item): "The Peacemakers," Memorial Day Navy Department broadcast on National Broadcasting Company, commemorating war dead of the U.S. Navy, Coast Guard, and Marine Corps, May 30, 1945.

Photographs (648 images): Of paintings and other graphic media relating to navy events, 1917-45 (FP, 64 images). Navy chaplains who served between 1799 and 1941, n.d. (PNC, NCP 572 images). Navy religious facilities, 1930-40 (NRF, 12 images). SEE ALSO 24.12.

24.6.2 Records of the Division of Naval Militia Affairs

History: Supervision of state naval militias vested in Assistant Secretary of War, 1891-1909. Transferred to Personnel Division, December 1, 1909, where Office of Naval Militia established, 1911. Functions assigned to Bureau of Navigation, 1912, where Division of Naval Militia Affairs established by General Order 93, Department of the Navy, April 12, 1914. State naval militias enrolled in National Naval Volunteers (NNV) during World War I. Federal laws respecting naval militias and NNV repealed, July 1, 1918, and Division of Naval Militia Affairs subsequently discontinued.

Textual Records: General records, 1891-1918. Index to correspondence, 1903-10. Letters sent, 1891-1911. Organization reports, 1913-15. Summaries of units' enrolled forces, 1915-16. Naval militia ratings' qualification certificates, July-December 1916. Allowance books, 1912-17.

24.6.3 Records of the Naval Reserve Division

Textual Records: Inspection reports of organized naval reserve units, 1st and 9th Naval Districts, 1928-40.

24.6.4 Records of the Division of Officers and Fleet

History: Successor in the Bureau of Navigation to the Office of Detail, 1889.

Textual Records: Letters received, 1887-90. Correspondence, 1891- 96. Registers of correspondence, 1891-96. Appointments of paymaster clerks, 1889-91 and acceptances of appointments, 1891- 98. Lists of naval and marine officers, and civilian officials at yards and stations, 1890-94.

24.6.5 Records of the Naval Academy Division

History: Bureau of Navigation, upon its establishment in 1862, assumed supervision of the U.S. Naval Academy from the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography. Responsibility delegated to Naval Academy Division, or Naval Academy Section, at an undetermined date.

Textual Records: General correspondence of the Academy Superintendent, 1851-58. Appointment letters, 1894-1940. Personnel files (jackets) of naval cadets, principally those who failed to graduate, 1862-1910. Registers of midshipmen, 1869-96.

Related Records: Records of the U.S. Naval Academy, RG 405.

24.6.6 Records of the Morale Division

History: Established as the Sixth Division by Bureau of Navigation Circular Letter 33-19, March 11, 1919, upon recommendation of the Navy Department Commission on Training Camp Activities, to maintain morale of naval personnel. Redesignated Morale Division, 1921. Transferred to the Training Division as the Welfare and Recreation Section, 1923.

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1918-24. Correspondence of the Commission on Training Camp Activities, 1918-20. Correspondence with foreign stations, 1920 and relating to ports, 1918-20. Recreation expenditure reports, 1920-22.

24.6.7 Records of the Training Division

History: Established April 19, 1917, to administer training programs for enlisted men in World War I. Reduced to section status in Enlisted Personnel Division, 1919. Restored to division status, March 1, 1923.

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1918-23. Administrative correspondence relating to training units, 1917-22. Records of the Welfare and Recreation Section, 1923-40. Morale reports, 1924-25. Reports on Naval Reserve training activities in Missouri (in Kansas City) and Indiana (in Chicago), 1923-25.

24.7 RECORDS OF OPERATING UNITS OF THE BUREAU OF NAVAL PERSONNEL
1900-86

Textual Records: Regulations maintained in the Office of the Chief of Naval Personnel relating to women accepted for volunteer emergency service, 1942-45. Records of the Administrative and Management Division, consisting of Bureau general correspondence, 1946-60 Bureau secret general correspondence, 1957-60 Bureau confidential general correspondence, 1925-60 case files of Bureau of Personnel instructions, 1950-86 and the document collection of the Technical Library, 1900-85. World War II administrative history of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, prepared by the Planning and Control Activity, n.d. Records of the Personnel Diary Section, consisting of microfilm copies of muster rolls, 1948-59. Records of the Training Division, consisting of historical files of Navy training activities, 1940-45 program files relating to the V-12 program, 1942-48 program files relating to officer training, 1928-46 records relating to U.S. Naval Academy expansion, 1962-63 and program files relating to the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps, 1964-68. Records of the Assistant Chief of Naval personnel for Reserve and Naval District Affairs, consisting of Naval Reserve program files, 1946-56. General records of the Physical Fitness Section, 1942-46, and the Recreation Services Section, 1943-46, of the Special Services Division. Records of the Publicity and Advertising Section, Recruiting and Induction Division, relating to the navy recruiting program, 1940-45. Records of the Recruiting Division, consisting of issuances relating to recruiting, 1955-68. Records of the Corrections Division, consisting of program files relating to naval corrections policies and facilities, 1944-51. Records of the Policy Division, consisting of case files on changes to the Bureau of Personnel manual, 1948-68 administrative records, 1956-69 daily reports of enlisted personnel, 1914-46 summary periodic statistical reports on military personnel, 1943-71 and operating force plans for the US fleet, 1928-43. Records of the Plans Division, consisting of correspondence relating to mobilization and Naval Reserves planning, 1950-64 and chronological file, 1950-60. Records of the Navy Occupational Classification Systems Management Division, consisting of case files relating to Navy ratings, 1945-78 and board, committee, and other reports relating to Navy ratings and grades, 1945-78. Casualty Branch records relating to casualties, prisoners of war, awards, and administrative matters, 1917-53. Records of the Casualty Assistance Branch of the Personal Affairs Division, consisting of ships, stations, units, and incidents casualty information files, 1941-60 casualty notification case files for Korean War and post-Korean War era Navy POWs/MIAs, 1963-86 alphabetical listing of casualties, 1941-53 casualty lists for World War II battles ("Battle Books"), 1941-45 records relating to the sinking of the U.S.S. Indianapolis, 1945 and VIP and group funeral files, 1940-67. Records of the Decorations and Medals Branch of the Personal Affairs Division, consisting of correspondence relating to US Navy awards to members of armed forces of foreign nations, 1942-63 eligibility lists for service medals and engagement stars, 1942-61 case files for Navy unit commendations and presidential unit citations, 1903-53 case files of World War II awards by delegated authority, 1941-48 Bureau of Navigation file of Navy Department Board of Awards correspondence and recommendations, 1917-20 and decorations and awards records from the Bureau of Personnel central files, 1946-73. Records of the Chief of Navy Chaplains, consisting of correspondence with chaplains, 1941-59 and annual, activity, and trip reports, 1949-57. Records of the Inspector General, consisting of inspection reports of Bureau of Personnel activities, 1959-80. Records of boards and committees, consisting of records of the Navy and Marine Corps Policy Board on Personnel Retention, 1966-69 and records of naval aviator evaluation boards, 1970-80. General records of the Naval Research Personnel Board, 1944-45.

24.8 RECORDS OF FIELD ESTABLISHMENTS
1838-1970 (bulk 1838-1946)

24.8.1 Records of the U.S. Naval Home, Philadelphia, PA

Textual Records (in Philadelphia): Letters sent, 1838-1911. Letters received, 1845-1909. General correspondence, 1910-40. Regulations governing the Naval Home, 1900, 1916. Station logs, 1842-1942.

24.8.2 Records of the Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, PA

Textual Records (in Philadelphia): Letters sent and received, 1855-63. Journal of activities, 1870-71. Admission and discharge registers, 1867-1917.

24.8.3 Records of the Indoctrination School for Officers, Fort
Schuyler, NY

Textual Records (in New York): General correspondence, 1941-46. Subject files, 1941-46. Muster cards, 1942-46.

24.8.4 Records of the Enlisted Naval Training School (Radio),
Bedford Springs, PA

Textual Records (in Philadelphia): General correspondence, 1942- 45. Subject files, 1942-45. Muster cards, 1942-44.

24.8.5 Records of the V-12 Unit, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH

Textual Records (in Boston): General correspondence, 1942-46. Subject files, 1942-46.

24.8.6 Records of the Naval Midshipmen's School, Northwestern
University, Evanston, IL

Textual Records (in Chicago): General correspondence, 1941-45. Records of the supply officer, 1941-45.

24.8.7 Records of the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps, Yale
University, New Haven, CT

Textual Records (in Boston): Administrative files of the commanding officer, 1941-70 and the Professor of Naval Science and Tactics, 1926-38.

24.9 CARTOGRAPHIC RECORDS (GENERAL)
1898-1944

Maps: Manuscript maps showing American and Spanish naval operations in Cuban waters during the Spanish-American War, 1898 (4 items). Strategic charts of the Atlantic, Pacific, and world oceans, showing distances between major ports, 1912-13 (4 items). Published maps of the United States, showing naval administrative districts and headquarters, 1919, 1935 (2 items). Pictorial wall map of the South China Sea, showing naval battles (1941-42), Japanese invasion routes, and location of economic products of interest to Japan, such as oil, rubber, and tin, 1944 (1 item).

24.10 MOTION PICTURES (GENERAL)
1917-27

World War I naval operations and activities, including anti- submarine patrols, minelaying, convoy and escort duty, submarine maneuvers, and training ship launching and maintenance torpedo production and firing Liberty Loan promotions and patriotic celebrations Armistice celebrations captured German equipment U.S. and foreign political and military leaders foreign naval vessels President Woodrow Wilson's second inauguration the airship Los Angeles (ZRS-3) over New York and lighter-than-air craft rescuing fishermen, 1917-18 (44 reels). Naval activities after World War I, including aerial mapping techniques, rescue of Armenian refugees from Turkey, evacuation of personnel from grounded and burning ships, escort duty, and training, 1918-27 (57 reels).

24.11 SOUND RECORDINGS (GENERAL)

24.12 STILL PICTURES (GENERAL)
1892-1945

Photographs (483 images): Artwork on navy subjects, portraits of Franklin D. Roosevelt, and a bronze relief of George Washington at Valley Forge, 1917-45 (PNCP, 13 images). Designs for medals and awards, views of navy ships and personnel, Egyptian scenes, and portrait and statue of John Paul Jones, 1892-1935 (PM, 70 images). Ships, aircraft, recruiting posters, and navy personnel, including the members of the Naval Aeronautical Expedition (1917), 1917-19 (PNA, 400 images).

Photographic Prints (4,745 images): President Herbert Hoover and crews of U.S.S. Saratoga and U.S.S. Mississippi, 1930 (H, 1 image). U.S. Navy enlisted personnel who were commended or who died during World War I, reserve officers, and officers of U.S.S. Arethusa, 1915-19 (CD, RP, RPA 4,096 images). Aircraft NC-2 and crew following transatlantic flight, 1919 (GC, 5 images). Navy training camps and schools, ca. 1916-20 (PAN, TC 579 images). Spanish naval vessels and damage to ships during the Spanish- American War, 1895-98 (FS, 64 images).

Lantern Slides (78 images): Humorous views of navy life used by the Navy Recruiting Bureau, New York City, 1925 (RS).

Color Slides: ca. 1860-ca. 1985 Navy recruiting posters, 1985 (NP, 47 images).

Posters (167 images): Recruiting for service in the U.S. Coast Guard, WAVES, Seabees, and other navy units and programs, 1917-87 (bulk 1941-45, 1970-87) (DP, PO).

SEE Photographs UNDER 24.3.1 and 24.6.1.

24.13 MACHINE-READABLE RECORDS (GENERAL)

Navy Military Personnel Command officers master file, FY 1990 (1 data set) officer history file, FY 1991-92 (2 data sets) and officer attrition file, ca. 1977-92 (2 data sets).

Bibliographic note: Web version based on Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States. Compiled by Robert B. Matchette et al. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1995.
3 volumes, 2428 pages.

This Web version is updated from time to time to include records processed since 1995.


Seeking ship logs of USS Pensacola

I am trying to find documentation/cause of a relative's death aboard the USS Pensacola in December 1907.  The cause has always been a family mystery.  I’m not sure where to start looking for this information.

Re: Seeking ship logs of USS Pensacola
Jason Atkinson 11.06.2020 12:01 (в ответ на Kate Beard)

Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

We searched the National Archives Catalog and located the Logbooks of U.S. Navy Ships, 1801 - 1940 in the Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel (Record Group 24) that include the deck logs of the USS Pensacola for 1907. We also located Muster Rolls of Naval Ships and Shore Establishments, 1/1898 - 6/30/1939 in Record Group 24 which may include muster rolls of the USS Pensacola for December 1907. For access to these logs, please contact the National Archives in Washington DC - Textual Reference (RDT1) via email at [email protected] .

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and pursuant to guidance received from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), NARA has adjusted its normal operations to balance the need of completing its mission-critical work while also adhering to the recommended social distancing for the safety of NARA staff. As a result of this re-prioritization of activities, you may experience a delay in receiving an initial acknowledgement as well as a substantive response to your reference request from RDT1. We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your understanding and patience.


World War II Database


ww2dbase Pensacola was the lead ship of her class of heavy cruisers. In the early 1930s, she served on both coasts of the United States. During the attack on Pearl Harbor which started the Pacific War and drew the United States into WW2, she was en route between Pearl Harbor and Manila she was diverted to Brisbane, Australia, and returned to Pearl Harbor on 19 Jan 1942. On 17 Feb 1942, she arrived off Samoa to join Task Force 11, which was centered around the carrier Lexington.

ww2dbase On 20 Feb 1942, Pensacola's anti-aircraft weapons helped to repel an aerial attack by 18 Japanese aircraft in two waves. On 6 Mar, carrier Yorktown joined the task force. Pensacola escorted the carriers in their offensives and patrols in the South Pacific until Apr 1942.

ww2dbase On 26 May 1942, Pensacola entered Pearl Harbor and joined with the carrier Enterprise. Two days later, they departed for Midway Atoll and made a rendezvous with Task Force 17 in which Pensacola participated in the Battle of Midway with. As Yorktown was attacked by Japanese aircraft, Pensacola left Enterprise to aid the carrier, but by the time she arrived Yorktown had already been disabled. While Yorktown's damage control crew worked furiously, Pensacola provided anti-aircraft support, shooting down four torpedo bombers during the second attack. After Yorktown sank, Pensacola returned to Enterprise and embarked on a chase of the Japanese forces. The Enterprise group returned to Pearl Harbor on 13 Jun.

ww2dbase On 22 Jun 1942, Pensacola transported 1,157 men of Marine Aircraft Group 22 to Midway, and remained in the Hawaiian chain until 7 Aug.

ww2dbase In Aug 1942, Pensacola sailed for the South Pacific. On 2 Oct, she departed Noumea, New Caledonia with carrier Hornet for Guadalcanal. On 24 Oct, the Hornet group joined Enterprise group, and two days later the combined force entered into the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands. During the battle Pensacola provided anti-aircraft support against Japanese dive and torpedo bombers, but she was not able to prevent Hornet from receiving fatal damage. Hornet was eventually abandoned Pensacola brought 188 survivors of the carrier to Noumea on 30 Oct. Although the price was hefty, the Americans stopped a major Japanese naval offensive.

ww2dbase In early Nov 1942, Pensacola guarded transports landing Marines on Guadalcanal. At Guadalcanal, she participated in the First Naval Battle of Guadalcanal on 13 Nov and the Battle of Tassafaronga on 30 Nov. In the latter action, among heavy gunfire, she was struck by two torpedoes, causing heavy damage. The torpedoes struck on the port side, flooding her engine room and ripping open the oil tanks, but she continued to fire the guns that remained functional. Despite the heavy damage, the damage control crew of Pensacola saved the ship, pulling into port at Tulagi while still aflame. 125 were killed and 68 injured at the end of the battle. After emergency repairs at Tulagi and Espiritu Santo, she arrived at Pearl Harbor on 27 Jan 1943 to receive proper repairs.

ww2dbase Pensacola's next mission was not until Nov 1943 when she bombarded Betio of Tarawa Atoll with 600 shells to soften Japanese defenses before the Marine landing. For the next two months, she performed as anti-aircraft screen for carriers and supply ships. In Jan and Feb 1944, she bombarded Japanese garrisons in the Marshall Islands. Between Mar and Apr 1944, she screened carriers across the Pacific. In Jun, she was transferred to northern Pacific, attacking Japanese airfields in the Kurile Islands in late Jun 1944 and patrolled off Alaska in Jul. Returning to Central Pacific, she bombarded Wake Island on 3 Sep and Marcus Island on 9 Oct. In mid-Oct, she participated in the campaign to gain control of the Philippines, including her direct involving at the landing at Luzon on 20 Oct.

ww2dbase In the night of 11 to 12 Nov 1944, Pensacola bombarded Iwo Jima. On 8 Dec 1944, 5 Jan 1945, 24 Jan 1945, and 27 Jan 1945, she bombarded Japanese defenses at Iwo Jima and Chichi Jima to prepare for the landing scheduled for 19 Feb. On 16 Feb, she was involved in the three days of pre-invasion naval bombardment, receiving six hits from Japanese shore batteries in the process, killing 17 men and injuring 119 others. She remained at Iwo Jima until 3 mar.

ww2dbase On 25 Mar 1945, Pensacola supported the landing at Okinawa and remained there until 15 Apr. She then returned to Mare Island Navy Yard in California, United States for overhaul. She exited from the shipyard on 3 Aug, by then the war was about to end. She anchored in the Japanese port of Ominato on 8 Sep as a part of the occupation force, and performed as a Magic Carpet transport to bring American servicemen home between Nov 1945 and Jan 1946.

ww2dbase Pensacola was decommissioned in 1946 after being used as the target of an atomic test. She was sunk on 10 Nov 1948.

ww2dbase Source: Wikipedia.

Last Major Revision: Nov 2006

Heavy Cruiser Pensacola Interactive Map

Pensacola Operational Timeline

6 Feb 1930 Pensacola was commissioned into service.
19 Jan 1942 USS Pensacola arrived at Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii.
28 May 1942 USS Enterprise and Task Force 16 departed Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii for Midway Atoll.
17 Aug 1942 USS Hornet and Task Force 17 departed Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii for the South Pacific.
5 Oct 1942 Task Force 17 (USS Hornet, Northampton, Pensacola, Juneau, San Diego, 3 destroyers) struck Japanese installations around the southern end of Bougainville in the Solomon Islands (Buin-Faisi-Tonolai Raid).
30 Nov 1942 Near Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, US cruisers ambushed a night time fast destroyer convoy led personally by Rear Admiral Raizo Tanaka. Tanaka's quick thinking led to a Japanese victory in the Battle of Tassafaronga. Cruisers USS Northampton, USS Pensacola, USS Minneapolis, and USS New Orleans (New Orleans-class) were badly damaged by torpedoes.
3 Sep 1944 Task Group 12.5 consisting of carrier USS Monterey, cruisers USS Chester, USS Pensacola, USS Salt Lake City, and destroyers USS Cummings, USS Reid, and USS Dunlap conducted a bombardment of Japanese positions on Wake Island in the Pacific.
26 Aug 1946 Pensacola was decommissioned from service.

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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Ted Gatchel says:
20 Jul 2016 05:34:14 PM

My father, John Philip Gatchel passed away on 1996. He was a 20 year navy veteran and served on the USS Pensacola in WW II. Is there any record that he served onboard, he was a CPO. Thank you.

2. John Fitzpatrick says:
27 Jan 2017 04:11:38 PM

My dad was on the USS Pensacola when it was struck. Are there records? He died in 1994. His name was also John Fitzpatrick.
I served in the Navy in Vietnam.

3. Mike Klein says:
2 Apr 2017 03:59:06 PM

My father, Bernard N. Klein was in V-Division aboard the USS Pensacola (CA-24) during 1943 to 1945, last two battles in the pacific. He gave me amazing photos taken during the war by the ship photographer. He passed in 2001, God bless them all!

4. C.J. says:
1 Jun 2017 08:29:55 PM

My friend, Don Evanstad, age 94, sailed on the Pensacola. He is doing well and will turn 95 this fall. Hats off to all of the men of the Pensacola.

5. Davidw says:
22 Aug 2017 03:32:00 PM

Pensacola was not part of the 1st Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, she was part of the screen for Enterprise.

6. Mark Weaver says:
22 Aug 2017 03:47:22 PM

My late uncle Harold H. Hiser served on the Pensacola and was wounded in action. He used to host an annual reunion of "Pensy Pals" every summer at his cottage in Sanford, MI.

7. Mike Klein says:
10 Nov 2017 11:10:00 AM

C.J., if possible, please ask Mr. Evanstad if he knew my father, his nickname was either Bernie or Mike. He served as a Metalsmith for the planes. I can contacted via [email protected] Thanks!

8. Anonymous says:
2 Mar 2018 01:29:42 PM

Can anyone tell me what battle (skirmish) the Pensacola was engaged in on 04 March 1942? Thanks.

9. David Stubblebine says:
2 Mar 2018 04:02:19 PM

Re: Comment Above:
On 4 Mar 1942, Pensacola was screening Lexington in the Solomon Sea. They had just repelled a bomber attack south of Bougainville on 20 Feb 1942 and were preparing for strikes against Lae and Salamaua in New Guinea on 10 Mar 1942.

10. David Desch says:
4 Mar 2018 10:00:16 AM

Does anyone remember serving with my Uncle Cecil Page, he was killed on the USS Pensacola during WW2. He was 19.

11. Karen says:
6 Mar 2018 02:22:18 PM

Thank you David. I am looking to confirm some information about a Y3C who was "Killed in Action" March 4, 1942. That date is according to his grave marker which doesn't necessarily mean it is correct. He was assigned to the Pensacola. Are there lists of casualties?

12. Anonymous says:
26 Apr 2018 06:55:52 PM

I have a photo of a sailor in uniform with USS Pensacola on his cap. Back of photo is a name of Riley S. Whiteside. Any info would be appreciated. Thank you.

13. Laurel says:
27 Jul 2018 07:13:21 PM

My dad Casey Pena was a gunman he revived purple heart

14. Bernadette says:
9 Dec 2018 07:59:27 AM

My grandfather, Bernard Subak, was on the USS Pensacola during WWII. He remembered the ship being hit, and his job was to weight down the body bags and sew them shut. He never really spoke about anything. He did however go to the reunions for the men that served on the ship, and I think that brought him comfort.

15. LARRY BRAYTON says:
17 Mar 2019 08:20:14 PM

I SERVED ON THE PENSACOLA IN 1945-46. WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM ANYOTHER SHIPMATES.

16. Anonymous says:
21 Mar 2019 02:02:25 PM

Larry Brayton, my grandfather was corpsman John Fitzpatrick on the Pensacola. He passed when I was 12, never got the stories. I served in the Marines 02-06. I’m sure if he were still around we would have great stories to trade. Does his name ring a bell?

17. Mark Stines says:
27 Aug 2019 07:40:22 PM

FM1 Robert Charles Russ was my mom's oldest brother..he was killed on Nov 30 during the Battle of Tasafaronga. he was working in the engine room that was hit with a torpedo..Ironically we both enlisted on September 27, him in ཥ and me in ྀ. I am named after him and sure wish I could have met him.

18. James Yavorsky says:
5 Feb 2020 05:12:13 AM

My uncle that I was named after, Rev James Yavorsky, was a chaplain on the Pensacola. At his eulogy it was noted that he buried 22 sailors at sea at Iwo Jima, but the information above says only 17 were killed in the hits from the shore batteries. There were a lot of others injured, so I would suspect that at least 5 died soon after. Does anyone know any specifics? I have seen a listing of the 17 that died, so who were the other five? Did those perish in another attack?

19. Bert Corcoran says:
28 Mar 2021 05:02:03 PM

My grandfather served on the Pensacola from sometime in late 1943 through the end of the war. I'm interested in collecting any photographs anyone has of that time and hosting them online. I have a handful and will be scanning them to share online. Email me at [email protected] if you want to share any documents, photos, etc.

All visitor submitted comments are opinions of those making the submissions and do not reflect views of WW2DB.


Prior to World War II [ edit ]

Leaving New York on March 24, 1930, the Pensacola transited the Panama Canal to Callao, Peru, and Valparaíso, Chile, before returning to New York on June 5. For the next four years she operated along the eastern seaboard and in the Caribbean Sea, several times transiting the Panama Canal for combined Fleet battle practice ranging from California to Hawaii.

Pensacola departed Norfolk on 15 January 1935 to join the Pacific Fleet arriving San Diego, her new home port, on 30 January. Fleet problems ranged to Hawaii, one cruise took her to Alaska, and combined fleet maneuvers returned her briefly to the Caribbean Sea before she sailed on 5 October 1939 to base at Pearl Harbor, arriving on the 12th. Pensacola was one of six ships to receive the new RCA CXAM RADAR in 1940. Maneuvers frequently found the cruiser off Midway and French Frigate Shoals, and she made one voyage to Guam.

World War II [ edit ]


USS Pensacola (LSD 38)

USS PENSACOLA was the third ANCHORAGE-class Dock Landing Ship and the fourth ship in the Navy to bear the name of the bay and city in Escambia County, Fla.

PENSACOLA was stricken from the Navy list on September 30, 1999, and sold to Taiwan the same day. There, the ship was renamed SHUI HAI and is still commissioned.

General Characteristics: Awarded: February 25, 1966
Keel laid: March 12, 1969
Launched: July 11, 1970
Commissioned: March 27, 1971
Decommissioned: September 30, 1999
Builder: General Dynamics, Quincy, Mass.
Propulsion system: two 600 psi boilers
Propellers: two
Length: 553 feet (168.6 meters)
Beam: 85 feet (25.9 meters)
Draft: 18 feet (5.5 meters)
Displacement: approx. 14,000 tons full load
Speed: 22 knots
Well deck capacity: three LCAC
Aircraft: none, but helicopter platform
Crew: Ship: 18 officers, 340 enlisted
Crew: Marine Detachment: 330 Marines
Armament: two 20mm Phalanx CIWS, two Mk-38 Machine Guns, four .50 Machine Guns

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS PENSACOLA. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.