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St. Louis University

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Established in 1818, Saint Louis University is the oldest university west of the Mississippi and the second oldest Jesuit school in the United States. Louis, Missouri, the coeducational institution is ranked among the top research institutions in the nation.The history of Saint Louis University dates to 1818, when it began as a private college to educate students in and around St. The Reverend Louis William Du Bourg, a Catholic bishop of Louisiana, was behind the institution's establishment. Over the years, the university added more courses and affiliated with several colleges.Today, St. The students also are given opportunities for research and to study on foreign campuses.The university’s library was founded in 1853 and houses an impressive collection, including titles in the ancient classics, English and French literature, travel accounts, ancient and modern history, theology, philosophy and science. Today, the library boasts numerous branches; the main branch's holdings consist of one million books, 6,000 journal subscriptions and 140 electronic databases.The university’s health center has four schools, three centers, one hospital, and a practicing physicians group. The health center provides modern research, quality education and hands-on training to prepare students for a life of service to others.


By Steven Louis Brawley

May 30, 2021: The St. Louis LGBT History Project has launched an innovative documentary style film series that is taking an unique approach to capturing community and individual histories. The Project's new "In Our Voices" film series allows people to tell their life stories in a non-traditional and unscripted manner. The first episode features the legacy of the Zebra Lounge and The Hitching Post, African American LGBTQIA+ spaces in midtown St. Louis from the 1970s-1980s. The 30-minute episode was hosted by Craig Greene and Candance Forrest (Candy Principle) and features partons and staff of the bars sharing their memories and experiences. The cameras rolled as people reminisced, laughed, and even danced. The commentary is lighthearted and serious. Several future episodes with new topics have been filmed and are in production mode. The Project has partnered with Taber Creative Productions to help produce the film series. Stay tuned for future episodes.


History of the University

When University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis was founded in 1864 as St. Louis College of Pharmacy, it was the first college of pharmacy west of the Mississippi River.

Since then, the University has played an integral role throughout history in the advancement of health care education.

Through times of war, economic depression and pandemics, the University has persevered and triumphed with innovation, evolution and the pioneering spirit of its founding. The University’s constant pursuit of excellence, insatiable curiosity and commitment to its students and community have always been the guiding light for our growth and expansion.

From our historic founding in a rented classroom to the campus we call home on Pharmacy Place, we have stood firmly in our mission to educate and advance communities of discovery to foster a healthier society.

Discovery Begins Here.

As we begin a new chapter as University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis, learn more about our brand and discover who we are, what we do and why we do it. MORE


History of Maryville University

Maryville University was created out of the Society of the Sacred Heart’s deep commitment to service, education and faith, and the indomitable spirit and courage of one of the order’s first and greatest pioneers, Rose Philippine Duchesne.

The Religious of the Sacred Heart deliberately and lovingly guided the growth and development of Maryville for 100 years with a progressive series of decisions and bold moves that proved to be profoundly effective. As a result, Maryville evolved from a small academy in the Dutchtown neighborhood of South St. Louis to an innovative and robust institution of higher education in West St. Louis County with students from around the country and indeed around the world.

Saint Madeleine Sophie Barat and “The Heart of an Educator”

Saint Madeleine Sophie Barat

Established in post-revolutionary France by Saint Madeleine Sophie Barat, the Society viewed as its purpose “to make known the love of God revealed in the Heart of Christ” (hence the motto, “Cor unum et anima una in Corde Jesu”— One Heart and One Mind in the Heart of Jesus).

Education has always had a special place in the mission of the Society. Saint Madeleine Sophie believed that, “Present day society will be saved by education other means are almost useless.” Her hope was that the Society would help restore Christian life in France by educating young women in both the rich and poor economic classes.

Saint Madeleine Sophie emphasized two abiding goals:

  • To reveal to the world a God who loves us.
  • To educate children to be a source of transformation in their world.

The Religious of the Sacred Heart of Jesus (in French, Religieuses du Sacré Cœur de Jésus, or RSCJ) make a vow of education which goes beyond the typical three vows of poverty, chastity and obedience made by most religious orders. The fourth vow of education does not simply refer to teaching, it implores each individual to have the “heart of an educator” in order to draw from every person his or her God-given gifts and talents so that “They may discover the significance of their lives, devote themselves to others and help transform the world.”

Stressing that “The main goal of education is not the mere imparting of knowledge, but the development of the individual,” Saint Madeleine Sophie established an educational philosophy that continues to drive Maryville’s mission and vision.

The Journey of Maryville’s Spiritual Foundress: Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne

Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne

Born in Grenoble, France in 1769, Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne first arrived at the village of St. Charles, Missouri in September of 1818. It was the end of a long journey and the beginning of one that continues today.

Saint Philippine was one of the first women to join the Society, which was founded in 1800. Saint Madeleine Sophie travelled to Grenoble in 1804 to meet Philippine. She welcomed her into her new order and together they established a foundation in that city.

Thus began the lifelong friendship between Philippine Duchesne and Madeleine Sophie Barat. But even greater was the attraction that drew the older of these two women to teach Native Americans in the New World. Living, by that time, in Paris with her beloved superior, Mother Barat, she met Bishop Louis DuBourg of Louisiana when he arrived in France in 1817 to recruit religious to help him evangelize his vast new diocese. Although her order was still very new, Mother Barat agreed to allow Mother Duchesne to embark on this bold missionary venture.

She travelled with four other religious from Bordeaux to New Orleans, a seventy-day voyage on the little ship, the Rebecca. After a brief stay with the Ursuline nuns in Louisiana, the five Religious of the Sacred Heart made the forty-day trip up the Mississippi to St. Louis on the steamboat Franklin. Having no house in the episcopal city to accommodate the nuns, Bishop DuBourg assigned them to St. Charles, where they rented the “Duquette Mansion,” a log cabin overlooking the Missouri River. One week later, on September 14, 1818, Philippine opened the first Sacred Heart school outside of Europe. It was the first free school for girls west of the Mississippi.

From Academy to College

The Religious of the Sacred Heart followed a path that, while long and winding, remained centered on a core set of values.

Philippine Duchesne did not stop after establishing the first school in St. Charles. She established a second in nearby Florissant, Missouri which was transferred to the Sisters of Loretto in 1846. Her third Academy of the Sacred Heart, established at Broadway and Convent streets in the city of St. Louis, opened in 1827 as La Maison de Ville, the City House. The property had been leased from philanthropist John Mullanphy for 999 years, with a provision that there would always be an orphanage on the property as well as the day school and boarding school.

The growth of St. Louis necessitated another move. In 1864, 21 acres of property at the corner of Meramec and Nebraska Streets (Withnell’s Grove) were purchased for the Academy for $40,000. After financial difficulties slowed construction, Maryville Academy (Mary’s Villa) was finally completed in 1872.

This new “country home,” designed by architect James McNamara, opened on September 5, 1872 with 80 boarding school students. Also part of the new complex was a free school for nearly 70 underprivileged children, and a novitiate for 11 young women.

During the following year, 1873, four young women received the first degrees conferred on the Maryville campus.

With its educational roots in France, the school was based on a six-year French Lycee pattern— which included the equivalent of junior college work at the two highest levels. Many French customs prevailed throughout the school, from the celebration of traditional French holidays (congés) to the games students played after school hours (a glorified hide and seek known as cache-cache) and even the daily snacks, or goûter. The French language was taught at all levels, and girls were encouraged to speak it at all times, especially during meals.

Some of Maryville’s first families were influential in the development of St. Louis.

Maryville students at work in the campus art studio.

Women stay current with coursework in study hall.

School activities included lectures, recitals, concerts and even early “moving pictures.” So complete was the education taught at the Academy, that—by 1900—women who continued their education after leaving the school were receiving college credit for their last two years there. By 1910, enrollment had reached 181, more than double its original.

From the very beginning, many of our distinguished alumni have been part of families who were influential within the St. Louis community—contributing to the civic, social and business development of the city. Some were descendants of the very early French families: Chouteau, Papin, Cabanne, Desloge, Benoist, Fusz, Chambers and Valle. Some were members of German families who arrived in the 1850s: Anheuser, Busch, Bardenheier, Griesedieck, Von Brecht and Padberg.

The Irish were represented by numerous descendants of Alexander McNair, the first governor of Missouri, and John Mullanphy, early patron of the Sacred Heart and father of a mayor of St. Louis.

There were daughters of families who were prominent in the 19th century growth of St. Louis: Fruin, Barney, Haydel, Gross, Schlafly, Clemens, Ring and more. There were descendants of Joseph Murphy, maker of the famous “Murphy Wagon”— the prairie schooner that took many pioneers west.

In addition to these first families of St. Louis, there are many multi- generational families—women, and now men—who continue the family tradition of a Maryville University education.

“I will not forget”

By 1912, Maryville’s lifelong impact on young women’s lives was already evident. Acknowledging this, former graduates met with Reverend Mother Reid and Mother Sturgis to plan the formation of a Maryville Alumnae Association. On May 15, 1913, the first Alumnae Association luncheon and meeting took place and the group adopted the motto that remains today: “I will not forget” (taken from Isaiah, 49:15).

“I Will Not Forget” motto was placed above the campus gymnasium door.

Later, in 1933, Maryville alumnae would co-sponsor with St. Charles, City House and Villa Duchesne the first meeting of alumnae from Sacred Heart academies and colleges throughout the country to form a national organization: AASH (Associated Alumnae of the Sacred Heart). More than 200 women would meet in St. Louis to create the ties that still exist today between alumni of this worldwide system of schools. Maryville alumna Sarah Chambers Polk, who promoted the case for greater connection among the associations, was elected the first President of the AASH. Historian and Maryville professor Louise Callan, RSCJ, wrote of this meeting: “It is fitting that the convention be held in St. Louis where Philippine Duchesne and her pioneer band had planted the seed that was now being harvested so splendidly.” (Society of the Sacred Heart in North America, pages 721-722)

A College is Born

In 1919, Maryville’s two highest classes (“first and superior classes”) were officially recognized as a Junior College by the state of Missouri. Then in 1923, it was announced that Maryville would become a four-year college, with the first degrees granted in 1925. By the end of the decade, Maryville College and its Academy formally separated, with Academy classes moving to a new West St. Louis County site named Villa Duchesne.

In 1941, one year after the beatification of Mother Philippine Duchesne was announced in Rome, Maryville College received independent accreditation from the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. True to its original mission, the College was rooted in a liberal arts tradition, with career-focused and pre-professional programs rounding out the curriculum. Maryville’s commitment to educating the whole student, academically, socially and morally, was key to its Sacred Heart beginnings, as was its commitment to serving the community surrounding the college.

Maryville moved to its current location in 1961

The College’s physical growth prompted a move to a new campus in West St. Louis County, dedicated by Cardinal Joseph Ritter on April 23, 1961. True to their “I will not forget” promise, Maryville’s alumnae led a $1 million development drive, which helped make construction of the campus possible. Maryville parents literally rolled up their sleeves to help the nuns sweep the new dorms and set up furniture just hours before the first classes arrived.

Amid 290 sprawling acres, four buildings comprised the campus: Gander, Duchesne, Reid and Kernaghan Halls.

Seeds of Change

By the end of the 1960s it was clear that a “revolution in higher education” was coming, and Maryville was ready to respond by reinventing itself to meet the needs of students while remaining financially solvent.

Key among the changes was the decision to admit men in 1968, then providing housing for them on campus in 1972.

The absorption of the nearby Mercy Junior College nursing program led to the creation of Maryville’s Department of Nursing and Allied Health (forerunner of today’s Myrtle E. and Earl E. Walker College of Health Professions).

Strategic partnerships with other local colleges expanded program options for Maryville students, and new programs and majors were added at an accelerated pace.

In 1972, Maryville’s Centennial year, the Society of the Sacred Heart turned governance of the College over to a lay board of trustees, with a provision for five Religious of the Sacred Heart to remain seated on the board at all times. Past and present, forever linked.

Maryville University Today: Leading the New Revolution in Higher Education

With historic growth over the past decade, the University now welcomes students from all 50 states and 58 countries. Some students attend remotely, via online courses accessed from all corners of the world. Others attend classes on the Maryville campus or at satellite locations in the evening and on weekends. Many of our 11,000 students still live on, or commute to, the main campus—now expanded with state-of-the-art classrooms, digital technologies and flexible living and learning spaces.

On the surface, today’s Maryville would seem to bear little resemblance to the sparsely-populated campus that opened in 1961, dotted with few classroom buildings and one residence hall. But, once again, a revolution in higher education is happening, and, like its spiritual founder Rose Philippine Duchesne, Maryville is leading the way.

Diversity and Inclusion is a core value of Maryville’s mission.

Maryville continues its leadership role in providing higher education to all.

  • Maryville is pioneering new, personalized teaching methods that are designed for the way each student learns.
  • Life Coaches advise and mentor students from before they set foot on campus and throughout each individual’s college experience, just as the Religious of the Sacred Heart once counseled each student through his or her educational journey.
  • Maryville is building partnerships throughout the community, both to strengthen its academic offerings and to fulfill its obligation of being a good neighbor in a civilized society.
  • With “Diversity and Inclusion” a core value of Maryville’s mission, strategic growth is carefully planned to ensure that students, faculty and staff reflect the racial and ethnic diversity of the American experience.
  • And just as the Religious of the Sacred Heart sought to extend the basic right of education to all students, rich and poor alike, Maryville seeks to provide necessary financial assistance to help all students achieve equity in their education.

Heart of Maryville Award

This award recognizes and honors alumnae who best exemplify the values and traditions of the Sacred Heart.
View Awardees

Bicentennial Celebration

An entire year of activities and remembrances will honor the Sacred Heart’s remarkable history of crossing frontiers.
View Events

Alumni Association

In 1913, the first alumnae association luncheon and meeting took place and the group adopted the motto that remains today: “I will not forget.”
Explore More


History

The project of establishing a center for psychosocial diagnosis and treatment for children goes back to the involvement of Fr. Geraldo Costa, CICM, in the ministry for street children in Metro Manila. In the years 1999 to 2000, Fr. Costa lived in the Senden Home Residential Center, Binangonan, Rizal while giving assistance to the children staying therein. In his dealings with the children, Fr. Costa observed that most of the children have a kind of “open wound” that hinder them to flourish to their full potential. Fr. Costa visited several other institutions in Metro Manila seeking to understand what was observed in Senden Home. He noticed that in the majority of the centers for children in special situations, that “open wound” was a constant. In interviews with directors and staff of residential and temporary shelters, he noted two main unanswered problems: first, the need to help the children to overcome past traumatic experiences, and second, the need to help the children to recover their personal development which seem to have been overwhelmed by the hardships in their lives. In a visit to the United Nations Children’s Fund-Philippines (UNICEF) and to the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) in Metro Manila at the end of the year 1999, the same concern was expressed.

A study about the needs of the children in special situations in the Philippines, especially in Metro Manila, was then presented by Fr. Costa to the RP-CICM Provincial Superior in the beginning of 2000. As a response, the Provincial Superior approved a project proposal which would assist the shelters and institutions working with children in need of psychosocial assistance.

In the Academic Year of 2001-2002, several steps were made towards the organization of a psychosocial therapeutic center for children. Firstly, weekly therapy sessions were given to the children of DSWD shelters in the Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR). Secondly, senior students from the Department of Psychology of Saint Louis University (SLU) started to give voluntary service to the Reception and Study Center for Children (RSCC) of DSWD in Puguis, La Trinidad, Benguet. Thirdly, active promotion of Children’s Rights in the SLU campus and in the areas of Baguio City and Benguet was accomplished. Fourthly, a small therapeutic playroom in the Home Sweet Home Compound was opened. And lastly, therapeutic sessions were given to children who need special attention and who also come from indigent families.

In the beginning of 2003, Fr. Paul Van Parijs, CICM, then SLU President, proposed to Fr. Costa to stay in SLU and establish the project of a Center for psychosocial diagnosis and treatment for children in Baguio City. The Center would be working together with the Department of Psychology, the Clinical Pastoral Office, and the Guidance Center of the university. Despite that the first plan was to have the Center in Manila, the RP-CICM Provincial Superior approved the proposal. Consequently, the services provided at that time in the small playroom in Home Sweet Home were extended.
In March 18, 2003, the SLU Sunflower Children’s Center was officially inaugurated in the Home Sweet Home compound where a room of the old Catholic Press was transformed in three small offices and a room for therapeutic sessions. The “sunflower” symbolizes hope that the children who come to the Center will bloom and grow towards the brightness of the sun. Just like the flourishing sunflowers that sway blissfully along the mountain ridges, the Center aims to help each child optimize his or her potentials in order to thrive functionally in a caring and understanding environment.

By the Academic Year 2003-2004, two courses related to the clinical approach in handling children’s cases were offered in the Graduate Program of Psychology, namely, Clinical Interventions for Children (Psych 232), and Psychotherapy for Children (Psych 233). The enrolled students had a hands-on application of the theories they had learned by holding actual therapeutic sessions in the Center. The courses are offered every two years, thus, increasing the number of child therapists serving children in need of psychosocial assistance.

As the years passed, a steady increase in the number of clients being referred to the Center was noted. In answer to this, there was a need to improve its capacity in offering psychotherapeutic interventions and psychological assessment. This was done by increasing the number of personnel to include a psychometrician, a child therapist, an assistant director, and a good number of volunteer child therapists and psychotherapists who render services to children referred by DSWD-CAR and other indigent families. Aside from the increase in staff, the Center also expanded its physical facility. From a small room in the main building of Home Sweet Home, the Center’s facilities now include two therapeutic rooms, a counseling room, and a testing room.

Indeed, the Center has grown and is continuously growing. For future directions, it is hoped that its services will cover a wider clientele to include not only younger children but also the youth and the family. By that time, history will show how far the Center has gone and how far it will go as it continues to make a mark as an institution dedicated to providing assistance to children of the Cordilleras and beyond.


History in a Timeline

Part of the Timeline

Brothers of the Society of Mary (Marianists) brought Catholic education to San Antonio when, in 1852, they opened St. Mary’s Institute. St. Mary’s University, an outgrowth of the brothers’ first educational undertaking, committed itself to the Marianist ideals of academic excellence, ethical commitment and service to the community.

The Marianists who established St. Mary’s were members of a religious order known as the Society of Mary, founded in 1817 by Blessed William Joseph Chaminade, a French priest who nurtured an idea of forming lay and religious societies that would reenergize the Christian faith in the post-French Revolution era. Four French Marianist missionaries traveled to Texas to open a school at the behest of Galveston Bishop John Mary Odin. In May 1852, these brothers stepped off the Indianola stagecoach to get a glimpse of downtown San Antonio where they would establish their school.

Click through these pages to read the highlights of St. Mary’s University’s rich and storied history, from our early days in the 1850s through today.


About SIUE

SIUE celebrated its 50th Anniversary in 2007. The institution traces its origin to a farsighted group of concerned parents and business leaders in the community. In 1955, the group began an advocacy campaign to establish a public university. By 1956, they had formed the Southwestern Illinois Council for Higher Education. Convinced that public higher education opportunities were needed in the Metro-East portion of the greater St. Louis area, the Council aggressively lobbied state officials and commissioned a consultant study to document that need.

In 1957, the See-Myers report was released and indicated that in Madison-St. Clair Counties, with 600,000 residents, the largest population concentration in the state outside of metropolitan Chicago, only three percent of the adult population had completed four years of college. There was no conveniently located university in the two-county area and many students could not afford to pay tuition and live away from home. Area business leaders and industrialists articulated an ever-growing need to hire college-educated employees.

In 1957, SIU opened two residence centers in Alton and East St. Louis. In 1958, the Council began a highly-successful private fundraising campaign to purchase land for a new campus. By 1959 enrollment had increased to 3,800 greatly exceeding the temporary facilities and available services. A planning team investigated permanent sites in the Metro-East counties and selected a location near Edwardsville. When Illinois legislators authorized a bond issue to fund public university facility improvements in 1960, area residents expressed their overwhelming approval at the ballot box. Groundbreaking for SIU Edwardsville was held in 1963. In 1965, SIUE opened the Peck Classroom Building and Lovejoy Library in the midst of 2,660 acres of rolling land and woods.

Today, fulfilling the dreams of the Council, SIUE is a premier Metropolitan University, offering a broad choice of degrees and programs ranging from liberal arts to professional studies. Undergraduate and graduate degrees are offered in the arts and sciences, business, education, engineering, and nursing. Professional degrees are available in dental medicine and pharmacy.

SIUE has maintained its historic ties to the communities of Alton and East St. Louis. The School of Dental Medicine maintains its campus in Alton, using many of the same buildings that housed its first students in 1957. The East St. Louis Center remains dedicated to improving the lives of individuals and families in East St. Louis and surrounding urban areas.

Since economic growth today is inescapably knowledge-based, through its skilled graduates, its faculty expertise in consulting and grants, and its multi-million dollar expenditures, SIUE contributes substantially to the economic vigor of our metropolitan region. SIUE is one of the largest employers in Madison County. More than sixty percent of SIUE alumni live within 50 miles of campus. Our graduates become part of a highly-educated, skilled workforce, enriching the communities in which they live.


History

The project of establishing a center for psychosocial diagnosis and treatment for children goes back to the involvement of Fr. Geraldo Costa, CICM, in the ministry for street children in Metro Manila. In the years 1999 to 2000, Fr. Costa lived in the Senden Home Residential Center, Binangonan, Rizal while giving assistance to the children staying therein. In his dealings with the children, Fr. Costa observed that most of the children have a kind of “open wound” that hinder them to flourish to their full potential. Fr. Costa visited several other institutions in Metro Manila seeking to understand what was observed in Senden Home. He noticed that in the majority of the centers for children in special situations, that “open wound” was a constant. In interviews with directors and staff of residential and temporary shelters, he noted two main unanswered problems: first, the need to help the children to overcome past traumatic experiences, and second, the need to help the children to recover their personal development which seem to have been overwhelmed by the hardships in their lives. In a visit to the United Nations Children’s Fund-Philippines (UNICEF) and to the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) in Metro Manila at the end of the year 1999, the same concern was expressed.

A study about the needs of the children in special situations in the Philippines, especially in Metro Manila, was then presented by Fr. Costa to the RP-CICM Provincial Superior in the beginning of 2000. As a response, the Provincial Superior approved a project proposal which would assist the shelters and institutions working with children in need of psychosocial assistance.

In the Academic Year of 2001-2002, several steps were made towards the organization of a psychosocial therapeutic center for children. Firstly, weekly therapy sessions were given to the children of DSWD shelters in the Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR). Secondly, senior students from the Department of Psychology of Saint Louis University (SLU) started to give voluntary service to the Reception and Study Center for Children (RSCC) of DSWD in Puguis, La Trinidad, Benguet. Thirdly, active promotion of Children’s Rights in the SLU campus and in the areas of Baguio City and Benguet was accomplished. Fourthly, a small therapeutic playroom in the Home Sweet Home Compound was opened. And lastly, therapeutic sessions were given to children who need special attention and who also come from indigent families.

In the beginning of 2003, Fr. Paul Van Parijs, CICM, then SLU President, proposed to Fr. Costa to stay in SLU and establish the project of a Center for psychosocial diagnosis and treatment for children in Baguio City. The Center would be working together with the Department of Psychology, the Clinical Pastoral Office, and the Guidance Center of the university. Despite that the first plan was to have the Center in Manila, the RP-CICM Provincial Superior approved the proposal. Consequently, the services provided at that time in the small playroom in Home Sweet Home were extended.
In March 18, 2003, the SLU Sunflower Children’s Center was officially inaugurated in the Home Sweet Home compound where a room of the old Catholic Press was transformed in three small offices and a room for therapeutic sessions. The “sunflower” symbolizes hope that the children who come to the Center will bloom and grow towards the brightness of the sun. Just like the flourishing sunflowers that sway blissfully along the mountain ridges, the Center aims to help each child optimize his or her potentials in order to thrive functionally in a caring and understanding environment.

By the Academic Year 2003-2004, two courses related to the clinical approach in handling children’s cases were offered in the Graduate Program of Psychology, namely, Clinical Interventions for Children (Psych 232), and Psychotherapy for Children (Psych 233). The enrolled students had a hands-on application of the theories they had learned by holding actual therapeutic sessions in the Center. The courses are offered every two years, thus, increasing the number of child therapists serving children in need of psychosocial assistance.

As the years passed, a steady increase in the number of clients being referred to the Center was noted. In answer to this, there was a need to improve its capacity in offering psychotherapeutic interventions and psychological assessment. This was done by increasing the number of personnel to include a psychometrician, a child therapist, an assistant director, and a good number of volunteer child therapists and psychotherapists who render services to children referred by DSWD-CAR and other indigent families. Aside from the increase in staff, the Center also expanded its physical facility. From a small room in the main building of Home Sweet Home, the Center’s facilities now include two therapeutic rooms, a counseling room, and a testing room.

Indeed, the Center has grown and is continuously growing. For future directions, it is hoped that its services will cover a wider clientele to include not only younger children but also the youth and the family. By that time, history will show how far the Center has gone and how far it will go as it continues to make a mark as an institution dedicated to providing assistance to children of the Cordilleras and beyond.


History

J ust after the turn of the century, All Saints Church opened north of Olive, and new homes were constructed in the surrounding area. On Delmar Boulevard, just west of the St. Louis city limit, the Delmar Race Track and the Delmar Garden Amusement Park were major attractions. Located on the south side of Delmar Boulevard were taverns, roadhouses and the occasional home. The Delmar streetcar “looped” through the southwest corner of the Delmar Garden Amusement Park before returning to downtown St. Louis.

L ewis’ idea for a residential community with comfortable homes for people of an upper middle class background was realized with the development of University Heights One. University Heights One was carefully designed around the landscape park and private place movements. Varying lot sizes, a great mix of architectural style and size and price of houses were represented. Before the subdivision was fully developed, it was important to the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair. Instead of letting the acres stand idle, Lewis built a tent city to house families visiting the Fair. The popular “Camp Lewis” offered comfortable and convenient accommodations and catered meals.


Our History

When the citizens of Normandy passed a bond allowing Normandy School District officials to purchase the Bellerive Country Club for $600,000 in 1957 for a community college site, the plan was locally criticized as a "speculative venture." Despite this criticism, a bond issue was passed to buy the 128 acre tract of land that included a club house, golf course, swimming pool, volleyball and tennis courts, and lake. Two years later, in September 1960, the two-year Normandy Residence Center opened for classes. Enrollment totaled 215 freshmen, who squeezed into 12 classrooms in the old clubhouse. Four full-time and eight part-time faculty were provided by the University of Missouri. After three years of operation as a residence Center, the Normandy School District and the university reached an agreement for the university to purchase the property and assume operation of the center. In September 1963, the Normandy Residence Center became the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

The Bellerive Country Clubs clubhouse remained the only campus structure until 1966, when Benton Hall, the first classroom-laboratory building, was completed, followed by Clark Hall in late 1968, the Thomas Jefferson Library in 1969, and Stadler Hall in 1970. Classroom space was nearly doubled in 1971 with the completion of five more buildings: The Mark Twain Building the University Center, the student union the J.C. Penney Building, the first privately financed building on campus Lucas Hall, the home of the College of Arts and Sciences and the Social Sciences and Business Building. In 1976 construction was completed on two more buildings: the General Services Building and Woods Hall, the central administration building. In 1976 the university also purchased the former Marillac College south of Natural Bridge Road and thus acquired the cornerstone of what would become the South Campus.

The 1990s was a decade of rapid growth for the campus with the addition of the dormitory, chapel, and administration buildings of the Sacred Heart Sisters, which afforded on-campus living for the first time in UMSL history. The Passionist Fathers Retreat Center was also acquired, adding more dormitory rooms for residential students. The University Meadows, a gated student apartment complex was built in a public/private partnership, which utilized undeveloped land adjoining the South Campus. The Kathy J. Weinman Building was funded by private donations and now houses the Childrens Advocacy Center and the Center for Trauma Recovery. And, in 1999, the Provincial House buildings of the Daughters of Charity were added.

Also during this time, the campus began a series of property acquisitions surrounding the North Campus in the communities of Normandy and Cool Valley along either side of University Boulevard (formerly North Florissant Road), and in unincorporated St. Louis County bounded by I-70, Hanley Road, and Natural Bridge Road. The William L. Clay Molecular Electronics Building and the studio arts complex were added and, in 2002, the Normandy Hospital building as acquired, bringing the South Campus complex to 44 acres, more than 20 buildings, and 1,000 residential units. Today, the South Campus is home to the Pierre Laclede Honors College, the College of Education, the College of Nursing, and the College of Optometry.

The Millennium Student Center opened its doors in 2000. Funded by students, the center is a one-stop-shop for student services and boasts event space, campus dining, study spaces, and a sky bridge connecting to the to the core academic quadrangle of the North Campus. The 2000s also brought a redesign of West Campus Drive, connecting the entrance to Natural Bridge Road the completion of three 600-space parking garages, one on West Campus and two on East Campus drive the acquisition of the St. Louis Mercantile Library construction of the Computer Center Building and the opening of the $56 million Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center.

In recent years the campus has benefited from the additional construction and renovation of additional academic and student life spaces, including a renovation of the science complex in Benton and Stadler Halls and the conversion of the General Services Building into a home for the former College of Fine Arts and Communication (now the School of Fine and Performing Arts). In 2012 the Student Government Association voted to fund the $36 million Recreation and Wellness Center, which opened in 2015 and featured state-of-the-art fitness equipment, a rock-climbing wall, a 155,000-gallon pool, and more. 2016 saw the addition of the 75,000-square-foot Science Learning Building on North Campus, a $35 million project bond-funded at the recommendation of the University Assembly Budget and Planning Committee to improve science learning facilities.

The state of Missouri invested in UMSL's infrastructure in 2015 with the announcement of $13.6 million in state bond funds to further renovate Benton Hall and the release of $10 million in 50/50 matching funds to construct a new business building. Anheuser-Busch Hall, named in honor of a lead $2.5 million gift from the Anheuser-Busch Foundation, opened in 2017 as the home of the College of Business Administration.

The foresight of the people involved in that "speculative venture" has been substantiated by time. Today, the University of Missouri-St. Louis has an enrollment of more than 17,000 students, making UMSL the second largest of the University of Missouri System's four campuses, the largest university in the St. Louis area, and the third largest in the state. On what was once the site of a country club with a single building, UMSL has grown to a campus of more than 50 buildings and structures situated on over 470 acres. Via Metrolink stops on both the South and North Campuses, students have direct access to the numerous educational, cultural, social, shopping, entertainment and sports complexes in St. Louis County and in Downtown St. Louis. Far from its humble beginnings, UMSL offers a full campus life experience to students from St. Louis and around world, including students from some 100 countries.

Former Chancellors

Thomas F. George
2003-2019
Donald Driemeier
(Interim)
2003-2003
Blanche Touhill
1990-2002
Marguerite Ross Barnett
1986-1990
Arthur MacKinney
(Interim)
1985-1986
Arnold Grobman
1975-1985
Emery Turner
(Interim)
1974-1975
Joseph Hartley
1973-1974
Everett Walters
(Interim)
1972-1973
Glen Driscoll
1969-1972
James Bugg
1965-1969


Edward Monaco, President of Normandy Board of Education, signs papers establishing the University of Missouri Normandy Residence Center. Behind him on his left is Ward E. Barnes, Superintendent of the Normandy School District, c. 1960


Bellerive Country Club, c. late 1950s, was the only building on campus until Benton Hall was built in 1966. It was known as the Administration Building and housed classrooms, offices, and the library.


Fire safety plan of the Administration Building, 1968


Members of Bellerive Country Club often swam in what later became known as Bugg Lake--named after the University's first Chancellor, James Bugg


Entrance off Natural Bridge Road into the University of Missouri Normandy Residence Center as the campus was called between 1960-1963.


As enrollments grew, University of Missouri officials expressed an interest in turning the Normandy Residence Center into a four year UM campus. In the Fall of 1963 with over 600 students enrolled, Normandy School District proudly committed its campus to the University of Missouri-St. Louis.


Over 100 people turned out for the dedication ceremonies as the Normandy Residence Center became the University of Missouri-St. Louis on September 15, 1963. The ceremony was held on the site now occupied by Woods Hall.


Aerial view of campus looking southwest. Excavation for construction of the J.C. Penney building in foreground. Benton and Stadler Halls shown in background. Administration Building, the former Bellerive Country Club club house shown in middle.


Aerial view of campus looking northeast showing Benton and Stadler Halls, Administration Building Thomas Jefferson Library and Clark Hall, c. 1969.


Workers transporting books out of the Administration Building library to be placed in the newly constructed Thomas Jefferson Library, 1969.


Susan Freegard, UM St. Louis' first library director, oversees the move into the newly built Thomas Jefferson Library, 1969.


In 1969, UMSL received a grant from the U.S. Department of Health Education and Welfare to provide recreational activities for inner city youth. Athletic facilities on campus provided over 200 St. Louis area youth a chance to hone their skills. Thomas Jefferson Library in background.


Swimming and sunbathing in front of the Thomas Jefferson Library, c. 1970s, The pool was opened to full-time days students in May of 1965. The pool was built in 1932 as part of the Bellerive Country Club.


The Fun Palace, near Bugg Lake, provided students a place to play ping pong or pool or enjoy a snack. The building originally contained the Physics department labs and was known as the Physics Annex.


Leonard Slatkin directs the St. Louis Symphony orchestra in a free concert on the athletic fields, 1977. Airplane traffic was temporarily redirected to ensure good acoustics.


Marillac Campus, also known as the South Campus, was previously the site of Marillac College, a four year liberal arts school run by the Daughters of Charity of St. Vincent DePaul. Marillac College opened in 1958 to educate Catholic sisters and offered degrees in teacher education, nursing and social work. The Daughters of Charity began subdividing their property as enrollments dropped in the early 1970s. The University of Missouri-St. Louis purchased the Marillac Campus in 1976 for $5 million. The School of Education and the Education Library became its first occupants. In 1998, UMSL acquired the Marillac Provincial House and six other buildings from the Daughters of Charity.


Benton Hall was the first building constructed on the university’s then-new campus in 1964. It’s part of a North Campus complex that includes the William L. Clay Center for Nanoscience, Anheuser-Busch Ecology and Conservation Complex, Research Building, Stadler Hall and the forthcoming Science Learning Building.


The Science Learning Building is four stories and 75,000 square feet, with 18 labs, seven new study areas, a solarium and a new Sodexo Simply to Go Café.


Anheuser-Busch Hall, the first space on UMSL’s campus solely dedicated to business education, opened for classes in August 2017.


During his 16 years at UMSL, Chancellor Thomas F. George oversaw a physical transformation of the campus while also helping the university deepen its roots as an anchor institution in the St. Louis region. George and his wife, Curators Distingished Professor of Music, both retired on September 1, 2019.


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