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Partners in Command, Mark Perry

Partners in Command, Mark Perry


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Partners in Command, Mark Perry

Partners in Command, Mark Perry

George Marshall and Dwight Eisenhower in War and Peace

This is a very fine dual biography, looking at the lives of George Marshall, the American Chief of Staff during the entire Second World War, and Dwight Eisenhower, the supreme allied commander in North Africa, Italy and finally France and Germany. These are two of the most important figures of the war - the "architect of victory" and his chief general.

Although Perry does begin his biographies well before the war, most of this book focuses on the wartime years. 1939 found George Marshall the newly installed Chief of Staff of the entire United States army, and Dwight Eisenhower a very junior officer, about to rise dramatically through the ranks. Six years later Marshall would still be in the same post, while Eisenhower had led the Allied armies to victory in France and Germany. This dual biography thus covers some of the most important moments of the war.

A central theme of this book is the responsibility of both Marshall and Eisenhower for the creation and maintenance of the Grand Alliance that fought and won the war. For a great deal of the time their main opponents would appear to have been their fellow Allied generals, many of whom would seem to have been blissfully unaware of the importance of their allies to an eventual victory.

One of this books great strengths is its balance. A surprisingly large number of even the best biographies of British and American generals tend to be rather partisan. One side or the other is always right, and the other side is either pointlessly stubborn (the British) or naive and inexperienced (the Americans). This is perhaps most common when looking at the battle over whether to invade France in 1942. This was an American plan, strongly opposed by the British and would almost certainly resulted in a disastrous defeat. Perry provides one of the best balanced accounts of this debate, which involved both Marshall and Eisenhower. It is comparatively rare for a biography of any senior American figures to admit that the British actually had a point when they opposed sending a small unprepared army across the channel in 1942. Perhaps most surprising is to find a biographer of American generals willing to admit that Montgomery was actually a good general (despite his well known character flaws!)

It is also refreshing to read an account of some of the fighting that acknowledges the mistakes that were made, especially in North Africa, on Sicily and in Italy. Perry convinces us that Marshall and Eisenhower were very great men, but doesn't attempt to portray them as flawless.

Author: Mark Perry
Edition: Hardcover
Pages: 496
Publisher: Penguin
Year: 2007



Partners in command

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Partners in Command

Category: World War II Military History | Biography & Memoir | 20th Century U.S. History

Category: World War II Military History | Biography & Memoir | 20th Century U.S. History

Apr 29, 2008 | ISBN 9780143113850 | 5-1/2 x 8-7/16 --> | ISBN 9780143113850 --> Buy

May 10, 2007 | ISBN 9781101202449 | ISBN 9781101202449 --> Buy

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Apr 29, 2008 | ISBN 9780143113850

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About Partners in Command

A unique look at the complex relationship between two of America?s foremost World War II leaders

The first book ever to explore the relationship between George Marshall and Dwight Eisenhower, Partners in Command eloquently tackles a subject that has eluded historians for years. As Mark Perry charts the crucial impact of this duo on victory in World War II and later as they lay the foundation for triumph in the Cold War, he shows us an unlikely, complex collaboration at the heart of decades of successful American foreign policy-and shatters many of the myths that have evolved about these two great men and the issues that tested their alliance. As exciting to read as it is vitally informative, this work is a signal accomplishment.

About Partners in Command

A unique look at the complex relationship between two of America?s foremost World War II leaders

The first book ever to explore the relationship between George Marshall and Dwight Eisenhower, Partners in Command eloquently tackles a subject that has eluded historians for years. As Mark Perry charts the crucial impact of this duo on victory in World War II and later as they lay the foundation for triumph in the Cold War, he shows us an unlikely, complex collaboration at the heart of decades of successful American foreign policy-and shatters many of the myths that have evolved about these two great men and the issues that tested their alliance. As exciting to read as it is vitally informative, this work is a signal accomplishment.


‘The Most Dangerous Man In America: The Making of Douglas MacArthur’ by Mark Perry

General of the Army Douglas MacArthur was one of the most shameless self-promoters in history. In April 1951, after MacArthur gave his famous farewell address to Congress (“Old soldiers never die, they just fade away”), Rep. Dewey Short of Missouri cried out, “We heard God speak today, God in the flesh, the voice of God!” When MacArthur was cast (and posed) as the hero of Corregidor in the opening days of World War II, mothers named their newborns after him. Others, more familiar with the general and his moods, were less enraptured. President Harry Truman fired MacArthur for insubordination, and his colleagues knew him to be vainglorious.

History has not been kind to MacArthur. “A recent, if informal, Internet poll listed him as America’s worst commander Benedict Arnold was second,” Mark Perry writes in his engrossing book on the great, though greatly flawed, general, “The Most Dangerous Man in America.” “A popular television series on the war has Marines on Peleliu cursing MacArthur for expending their lives in seizing the island needlessly.” MacArthur, the author notes, “had nothing to do with the battle.”

Perry sets out to rehabilitate MacArthur — or at least to set the record straight about his strengths as well as his weaknesses. A close student of Napoleon and Genghis Khan, MacArthur was an innovative genius, especially when it came to moving enormous numbers of troops over vast distances. Perry deals only with MacArthur’s role in World War II the book ends before his successful shogunate in postwar Japan and his wildly up-and-down record in Korea. But fans of military history and general readers will have much to enjoy and to ponder: The author offers a vivid and convincing recounting of MacArthur’s tremendous skill as a pioneer of air-land-sea battle in the Pacific, along with ample evidence that “proud and egotistical” MacArthur “was his own worst enemy.”

MacArthur, Perry writes, could be “short-tempered, abrupt, sullen, and impatient.” Also “small-minded, embittered, suspicious.” His staffers were, by and large, toadies. “You don’t have a staff, general, you have a court,” scoffed his boss, Army Chief of Staff George C. Marshall. Franklin Roosevelt was well aware of MacArthur’s limitations. In the summer of 1932, when New York Gov. Roosevelt was the newly anointed Democratic nominee for president, he discussed with his advisers MacArthur’s heavy-handed rout of the Washington Bonus Marchers, impoverished World War I veterans encamped along the Anacostia River in the nation’s capital. MacArthur was “the most dangerous man in America,” suggested Roosevelt, who saw MacArthur’s potential to become the Man on the White Horse, a pseudo-Napoleon willing to sacrifice liberty to restore stability to a frightened people. Roosevelt lumped MacArthur with demagogue Huey Long, the fiery populist governor of Louisiana. But, Roosevelt went on to say, “We must tame these fellows and make them useful to us.”

With his keen insight into human nature, Roosevelt understood that it takes outsize personalities to accomplish great things. Ordinary men, though saner and humbler, lack the will and boldness. The trick was to co-opt MacArthur, which Roosevelt cleverly did by holding him close (so he would not be a political rival) and making sure that he had good commanders to carry out his orders. Perry notes that, while MacArthur’s staff was obsequious, his ground commanders in the Pacific island-hopping campaign were generally first-rate. Perry especially credits the somewhat overlooked Gen. Robert Eichelberger who, in his private letters to his wife, referred to MacArthur as “Sarah,” after the histrionic actress Sarah Bernhardt.

"The Most Dangerous Man in America" by Mark Perry (Basic)

MacArthur had showy, inspirational bravery. Inspecting the front lines on the embattled island of Los Negros, he was momentarily stopped by an Army officer who said, “Excuse me, sir, but we killed a Jap sniper in there just a few minutes ago.” MacArthur responded: “Fine. That’s the best thing to do with them,” and kept moving forward into the jungle. But he was also a “realist, the quiet and somber man he rarely allowed anyone to see,” Perry notes. On the eve of World War II, MacArthur was visited in his Manila headquarters in the Philippines by journalist Clare Boothe Luce, who wanted to profile him for Life magazine. Luce asked MacArthur his theory of offensive warfare. “Did you ever hear the baseball expression, ‘hit ‘em where they ain’t?’ That’s my formula,” he jauntily explained. “But when she then asked him for his formula for defensive warfare, he hesitated,” Perry relates, “before finally answering. ‘Defeat.’ ”

Perry is an excellent military historian who wrote an insightful book, “Partners in Command,” about Gen. Marshall and Supreme Allied Commander Dwight Eisenhower. Perry gets the human element. He understands that human foibles are inevitable and particularly likely to show under the stress of war. These shortcomings can be unfortunate and self-destructive, but also reflect aspects of character that may be necessary to achieve victory. The media and popular opinion can be too quick to glorify military heroes, and historians and revisionists too eager to cut them down to size.

MacArthur was hardly the only military commander with an ego. Perry observes that Adm. Ernest King “despised” Gen. George Patton, and that Army Air Force Gen. Hap Arnold “couldn’t bring himself to talk to King,” and that Eisenhower thought British Field Marshall Bernard Montgomery was “conceited,” and that “Patton held all British commanders in disdain,” while Gen. Omar Bradley “plotted ways to take advantage of Patton’s antics.” Aside from vanity, these feuding warlords had only one thing in common: They won.


Partners in Command, Mark Perry - History


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog

Information from electronic data provided by the publisher. May be incomplete or contain other coding.

The depth and significance of the relationship between George Marshall and Dwight Eisenhower has eluded historians for years. In Partners in Command, acclaimed historian and journalist Mark Perry gets to the heart of arguably the most fateful partnership in American military history, a union of two very different men bound by an epic common purpose. He follows Marshall and Eisenhower's collaboration from the major battles in North Africa and Italy to the planning and execution of the D-Day invasion, the crisis of the Battle of the Bulge, and the postwar implementation of the Marshall Plan, and the establishment of Eisenhower's leadership of NATO. erry shows that Marshall and Eisenhower were remarkably close colleagues who brilliantly combined strengths and offset each other's weaknesses in their strategic planning, on the battlefields, and in their mutual struggle to overcome the bungling, political sniping, and careerism of both British and American commanders that infected nearly every battle and campaign. Finally, Marshall and Eisenhower collaborated in crafting the foreign policy and military infrastructure that became the foundation for winning the Cold War.

From their first meeting after Pearl Harbor in 1941, Marshall and Eisenhower recognized in each other an invaluable military partner-by February 1942, Marshall, who was Army chief of staff, had promoted Eisenhower to head the War Plans Division, where his first job was to write the initial plan to win the war against Japan. Within a few months, Marshall selected Eisenhower as commander of all U.S. forces in the European theater. By early 1944, however, a subtle but major shift had occurred: Marshall the teacher had become Eisenhower's student, Eisenhower having developed the superior grasp of command challenges.

Partners in Command is an extraordinary portrait of an often ignored alliance between two iconic military figures and the ways in which their unusual collaboration would ultimately shape fifty years of successful American foreign policy.

Library of Congress subject headings for this publication:
Marshall, George C. -- (George Catlett), -- 1880-1959 -- Military leadership.
Eisenhower, Dwight D. -- (Dwight David), -- 1890-1969 -- Military leadership.
World War, 1939-1945 -- United States -- Biography.
Strategy.
Generals -- United States -- Biography.


Partners in Command

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Partners in Command George Marshall and Dwight Eisenhower in War and Peace by Mark Perry and Publisher Penguin Books (P-US). Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781101202449, 1101202440. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9781594201059, 1594201056.

Partners in Command George Marshall and Dwight Eisenhower in War and Peace by Mark Perry and Publisher Penguin Books (P-US). Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781101202449, 1101202440. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9781594201059, 1594201056.


Partners in Command: George Marshall and Dwight Eisenhower in War and&hellip

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I have a growing library of biographies of WWII high profile people (mainly US generals). This book was a decent compilation of the relationship between Marshall and Ike. Many of the factual details of their relationship and personal time lines are already well known. No big surprises. The differences in stances and viewpoints over the Italian campaign, Operation Anvil and delays in the Normandy invasion are better explained here than in other biographies.

I enjoyed the review of the personalities and influences of Roosevelt and Churchhill on these two generals. British General Bernard Law Montgomery actually comes out with a slightly (only slightly) better appeal than with most other books. His meticulous planning for the Overlord invasion is credited. However, his advance on and exploitation of the enemy after the invasion were not exactly stellar.

The record of correspondence from Ike to Marshall during the war is well known. This book extends the correspondence by providing background and added details. Helps to fill in some blanks and add to understanding of these two men and their unique partnership. A good book, but don't count on new breath-taking information. ( )


Oliver Hazard Perry Class Frigates Sail Into Naval History Simpson Decoms

For the first time in almost 38 years, there will be no Oliver Hazard Perry (OHP) Frigate on the fleet rolls of the United States Navy. USS Simpson (FFG 56) was decommissioned in her homeport of Mayport on Sept. 29th, and represented the last of frigate in the Navy's inventory.

"Like today's Littoral Combat Ship, the Perry class frigate received a lot of criticism when it was first introduced, yet went on to provide decades of exceptionally versatile and valuable service to our nation. Many disparaged her supposedly limited sensor suite, among other things, failing to recognize the significant impact of her new generation helicopter capability. And, as the USS Samuel B. Roberts demonstrated, the ship was much tougher than many initially gave her credit for, especially in the hands of well trained and well led Sailors," said retired U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Sam Cox, who is currently the director of the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC).

The OHP Frigates were originally designed as cost efficient surface combatants with limited anti-air defense and anti-submarine warfare capabilities, to serve as escort protection for other ships. In hindsight they proved to be the U.S. Navy's "little ship that could" for enduring missions that mushroomed over the last four decades, including maritime interdiction operations, counter narcotic efforts, and engagements with partner navies in fulfilling the Cooperative Strategy for 21st Century Seapower, also known as the Maritime Strategy.

Ultimately the U.S. Navy commissioned 51 FFG-7 class frigates between 1977 and 1989, built by Bath Iron Works and Todd Shipyards. From the inception of the FFG-7 program, the Navy recognized a need for a large number of these frigates to replace World War II destroyers that were due to retire. In order to meet this numerical requirement, stringent design controls were placed on the size and, in particular, the costs, of the FFG-7.

During protracted periods of austerity, the ships and their crews suffered from spare parts shortages and reduced maintenance support. As a result the men assigned to the ships became known for their determination, ingenuity and grit to meet mission - with whatever was available. It became, for the community of OHP frigate Sailors, a badge of honor.

Sailors have traditionally been a superstitious lot, and the lead ship in the class, the USS Oliver Hazard Perry (FFG 7), provided literally an auspicious launch (see one minute mark). At her launch ceremony on 25 September 1976, the crowd watched anxiously as the ship failed to roll down the slip-way when the ceremony called for it. As if scripted, movie star actor John Wayne (the "Duke") jogged up to the ceremonial platform from his seat in the gallery and gave the bow of the frigate a shove with one hand, and famously appeared to have 'pushed' the 445-foot, 4,100-ton warship down the ramp.

Not unlike that magic moment, the ships and men who crewed them have always managed to demonstrate surprising timely guile - despite the odds. Their relatively limited firepower and size never seemed to disqualify them most tasks, and time and again the ships proved suited for most any assigned mission.

On routine patrol in the Arabian Gulf when Iraq invaded Kuwait on Aug. 2, 1990, the USS Taylor (FFG 50) and USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) were part of a small flotilla of ships that served as the original participants of Operation Desert Shield, which dissuade further Iraqi offensive action until the coalition assembled and transitioned to offensive action under Operation Desert Storm. While the force amassed, the two FFGs served to implement the United Nations authorized blockade of Iraq.

During Desert Storm, USS Nicholas (FFG 47) and the Kuwaiti fast attack craft Istiqlal (P 5702) conducted the first surface engagement of the war on Jan. 18, 1991. Supporting combat search and rescue operations for the air campaign, Nicholas employed her Seahawk helicopters to scout the Dorrah oilfield.

Despite nearby Iraqi combatant ships and aircraft armed with Exocet missiles, Nicholas and Istiqlal sailed within a mile of the southern platforms. Once in range, the Nicholas' helicopters launched precision-guided missiles that destroyed enemy positions on the two platforms. As a result the frigate took the first 23 enemy prisoners of war.

Nicholas later attacked Iraqi patrol boats operating less than a mile from the Kuwaiti coast, and sank or heavily damaged four enemy craft.

The ships themselves demonstrated in battle they were also capable of withstanding considerable damage. Their stoutness was proven when USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) struck a mine, and USS Stark (FFG 37) was hit by two Exocet cruise missiles, both patrolling the Arabian Gulf at the time.

In the case of the Samuel B. Roberts' mine strike, on April 14, 1988 the U.S. launched Operation Praying Mantis, where coalition air and surface units destroyed the two Iranian oil rigs and also Iranian units attempting to counter-attack U.S. forces.

During the operation the USS Simpson (FFG 56) participated in destroying the 147-foot missile patrol boat Joshan (P 225), avenging the damage inflicted on her sister ship. In fact, by the end of the operation, U.S. air and surface units had sunk, or severely damaged, half of Iran's operational fleet.

The OHP class proved itself worthy in a different war the U.S. has been waging for decades: Stemming the tide of illegal narcotics entering the nation from the sea. The frigates proved to be the platform of choice, and their presence resulted in dozens and dozens of drug seizures worth an estimated street value measured in billions of dollars.

While the ships and crews have proven worthy, the reality remained that they lacked the multi-mission capabilities necessary for modern surface combatants faced with increasingly available high-technology threats. Their design also offered limited capacity for change.

In time, arguably because of their relatively diminutive status, the ships and crews serving in the class very much came to embody the same hallmarks of determination, gumption, self-reliance and surprising effectiveness as their namesake, Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry (1785 - 1819). When war with Great Britain was declared on June 18, 1812, Perry was assigned to what he considered an insignificant command of small gunboats at Newport. While his fellow officers gained glory on sleek vessels like the Constitution and Hornet, Perry was dissatisfied with the opportunity given him. After petitioning the Navy Department, he earned assignment to complete construction and soon after successfully lead a flotilla in the Battle of Lake Erie, forever earning a place in Navy history.

The capabilities of the OHP frigates will now be subsumed by new ships like JHSV, LCS, Mobile Landing Platforms and Afloat Forward Staging Bases deliver the capabilities today's environment demands.

The Secretary of the Navy announced in January 2015 that going forward, new Freedom- and Independence-class ships will be christened under the frigate designation


Captain In Command

Ali Carter won all three of his matches on the first day of Group Six of BetVictor Championship League Snooker, continuing his fine run of form since entering the event at Stadium MK, Milton Keynes earlier this week.

Carter topped the league standings in Group Five before losing out to Mark Williams in Thursday evening’s play-offs. However, the Essex man rolled his momentum into the next group, beating Mark Williams and Joe Perry 3-0 before a 3-1 success over Li Hang.

Anthony McGill tops the table having won one frame more than Carter, but the Scot has also played a match more.

David Gilbert and Mark Williams both have two points to their name, while Liang Wenbo and Li Hang have one win each, having already played four of their six group matches.

Joe Perry is bottom of the overnight group table having suffered three defeats on Friday, but with three more matches to play.

Live coverage of BetVictor Championship League Snooker is available on Matchroom.Live as well as on Freesports in the UK & Ireland, Zhibo.tv in China and on global betting platforms.

Group Six continues at 12:30pm on Saturday. Group fixtures and results can be found at www.championshipleaguesnooker.co.uk

Follow BetVictor Championship League Snooker on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for all the latest news and scores from Stadium MK.


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