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McCord II DD- 534 - History

McCord II DD- 534 - History


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McCord

Comdr. Frank C. McCord, USN, born at Vincennes, Ind., 2 August 1890, was appointed midshipman 5 July 1907. From 1925 on, his career centered on naval aviation. On 30 June 1932 he reported for duty on the dirigible Akron, assuming command 3 January 1933. He died when the lighter-than-air craft crashed off the coast of New Jersey, 4 April 1933.

(DD-534: dp. 2,050; 1. 376'; b. 391 7"; dr. 171 9"; s. 37 k.; cpl. 273; a. 5 5", 10 40mm., 7 20mm., 1.0 21" tt., 6 dcp, 2 dct.; cl. Fletcher)

McCord (DD-534) was laid down 17 March 1942 by the Bethlehelm. Shipbuilding Co., San Francisco, Calif., launched 10 January 1943; sponsored by Mrs. McCord, widow of Commander McCord; and commissioned 19 August 1943, Comdr. W. T. Kenny, in command.

McCord, departing San Diego 27 November 1943, joined the Pacific Fleet in time for operations in the Marshalls and Marianas, and remained in continuous action through the Palau, Philippine, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa campaigns.

She arrived off Kwajalein as a unit of T.F. 51, 30 January 1944. During Operation "Flintlock," she screened transports and provided rapid close support fire. On 15 February the task force sortied from Kwajalein to Eniwetok Atoll for operation "Catchpole." McCord at first screened the minesweepers as they cleared the passages into the 388-square-mile lagoon and then screened the bombardment group as Engebi Island, containing the Atoll's only airfield, was secured, 17 to 18 February. On the 21st, she steamed back to the southern end of the lagoon for the bombardment of Eniwetok and Parry Islands.

By mid-March McCord had rendezvoused with TF 39 in the Bismarck Archipelago and for 2 weeks she cruised in the Ysabel. Channel in support of landings at Emirau Island, 21 March. She next escorted replacement troops from Purvis Bay, Florida Island, to Emirau. Returning to Purvis Bay at the end of April, she departed 1 May to escort tankers to refueling positions in the Solomons area. On 11 June, after 2 weeks of antisubmarine patrols in the Bougainville-New Georgia area, she arrived off New Ireland to bombard an enemy tank repair installation, resuming escort duties upon its destruction. Interrupting her escort service between the Admiralties and the Solomons on 23 July, she joined TF 52 at Saipan and took part in the shelling of Tinian.

The Palau Islands offensive was next. She arrived off Pelelieu 11 September and remained through the 30th to support the forces landed on the 15th. On her arrival at Manus 4 October, McCord joined CarDiv 22, 7th Fleet, as it prepared for operations in the central Philippines. She arrived at her assigned operating area east of the Philippines as landings were made at Suluan and Dinagat, 17 October. On the 25th her task unit, 77.4.1, came under constant air attack as the battle off Samar raged 100 miles to the north. Escaping damage, McCord protected her unit's carriers and rescued their pilots. She returned to Manus 3 November, but was back off Leyte by the 16th to prevent enemy surface forces from attacking Allied forces, installations, and shipping in the central Philippines.

On 6 December, at Ulithi, McCord joined the fast carrier force, TF 38. The force sortied from that island on the 10th and steamed to the Philippines to support the Mindoro landings by launching strikes against enemy airfields and harbor,; In the northern and central islands. Back at Ulithi by the 24th, they sortied again on the 30th. First they struck at Formosa, 3 to 6 January 1945. Then, in quick succession, they raided enemy installations and shipping in Indochina, southern Formosa, the China coast, the Philippines, eastern Formosa, and Okinawa. Constantly moving and always ready for targets of opportunity, the force's strikes were successful. While in the South China Sea on the 11th and 12th they sank or damaged almost 200,000 tons of enemy shipping.

The force returned to Ulithi 23 January, remaining until 10 February. On the 16th, strike,,, were launched against Tokyo itself; on the 18th against Chichi Jima; and on the 20th against Iwo Jima in support of the marine units landed on the 19th. By the 24th, the planes from TF 58 were back over Tokyo and on the 25th they flew against defense installations in the Nagoya-Kobe area.

During Marech, McCord continued to operate in the screen of TG 58.4 as it concentrated its efforts against Okinawa and southern Kyushu in preparation for the amphibious assault on the former 1 April. She remained in the Ryukyu area until 12 May when she escorted South Dakota to Guam. She returned to Okinawa on the 27th for a final 2 weeks of combat. TG 58.4 then retired to Leyte Gulf, arriving 13 June.

McCord departed 4 days later for the west coast and a navy yard overhaul. On 8 July she arrived at Puget Sound, where she was docked when the Japanese surrender was announced. On 7 September she steamed to San Diego, reporting on the 15th to the Inactive Fleet.

Decommissioning 15 January 1947, she remained berthed at San Diego until recommissioning 1 August 1951. Assigned to the Atlantic Fleet, McCord departed San Diego 1 November and reported to ComDesRon 29 at Norfolk on the 17th. For the next year she operated along the east coast, cruising as far north as Halifax and as far south as the British West Indies.

On 10 January 1953 the destroyer once a gain got underway for a western Pacific war zone. By 15 February she was off the west coast of Korea operating with carriers in TF 95. 'She remained in the Yellow Sea combat zone until mid-March when she received a week's availability at Sasebo. On 26 March she joined TF 77 as it ranged the east coast of Korea providing shore bombardment and fire support services where needed by the U.N. forces. Departing the battleline 17 April, McCord joined TG 96.7 in exercises off Okinawa. She rejoined TF 77, 14 May, and remained in the Sea of Japan operations area until 5 June when her Korean deployment terminated and she got underway for the United States.

Steaming via Subic Bay, Singapore, Aden, Suez, and Gibraltar, she arrived at Norfolk 6 August. During the next months she operated off the southern east coast and in the Caribbean. She decommissioned 9 June 1954 and was berthed at Norfolk, where, as a unit of the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, she has remained into 1969.


FRANK C. MCCORD, CDR, USN

ALICE achieved fame Plebe summer through his blushing competitions with "Mac," the competitions being a feature of every meal. A very modest sort of chap and as straight as a die. Known as "Alice of old Vincennes" and until our return from Second Class leave, his continued refusal to be enticed to the hops led us to believe in his attachment to some fair one at home. Fond of relating experiences, the principal draw-back being that he insists on repeating them five or six times. One of the favored ones who can get through on very little boning. Reads novels in study hours and is an inveterate smoker, being particular fond of bull scags. Sick most of First Class Cruise, losing more weight than some of the boys on the "Iowa," which is saying a good deal. Of the sort who hoe their own row, doing much and saying little.

Frank Carey McCord was born in Vincennes, Indiana, on August 2, 1890. Prior to coming to Annapolis he lived in his native town, spending three years at the High School of that city. His present home address is Vincennes. He was appointed from Indiana.

Frank Carey McCord

ALICE achieved fame Plebe summer through his blushing competitions with "Mac," the competitions being a feature of every meal. A very modest sort of chap and as straight as a die. Known as "Alice of old Vincennes" and until our return from Second Class leave, his continued refusal to be enticed to the hops led us to believe in his attachment to some fair one at home. Fond of relating experiences, the principal draw-back being that he insists on repeating them five or six times. One of the favored ones who can get through on very little boning. Reads novels in study hours and is an inveterate smoker, being particular fond of bull scags. Sick most of First Class Cruise, losing more weight than some of the boys on the "Iowa," which is saying a good deal. Of the sort who hoe their own row, doing much and saying little.

Frank Carey McCord was born in Vincennes, Indiana, on August 2, 1890. Prior to coming to Annapolis he lived in his native town, spending three years at the High School of that city. His present home address is Vincennes. He was appointed from Indiana.

Frank was lost when the airship USS Akron (ZRS 4) crashed off the coast of New Jersey on April 4, 1933. He had been the airship's commanding officer since January 3, 1933 he had served aboard since June 1932.

He was survived by his wife he has a memory marker in Arlington National Cemetery.

Akron 's executive officer, LCDR Herbert V. Wiley '15, one of only three survivors, was filmed shortly after the crash:


McCord, departing San Diego 27 November 1943, joined the Pacific Fleet in time for operations in the Marshall Islands and Marianas, and remained in continuous action through the Palau, Philippines, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa campaigns.

She arrived off Kwajalein as a unit of Task Force 51 (TF 51), 30 January 1944. During Operation “Flintlock”, she screened transports and provided rapid close support fire. On 15 February the task force sortied from Kwajalein to Eniwetok Atoll for operation “Catchpole”. McCord at first screened the minesweepers as they cleared the passages into the 388-square-mile (1,000 km 2 ) lagoon and then screened the bombardment group as Engebi Island, containing the Atoll’s only airfield, was secured, 17󈝾 February. On the 21st, she steamed back to the southern end of the lagoon for the bombardment of Eniwetok and Parry Island.

By mid-March McCord had rendezvoused with TF 39 in the Bismarck Archipelago and for 2 weeks she cruised in the Ysabel Channel in support of landings at Emirau Island, 21 March. She next escorted replacement troops from Purvis Bay, Florida Island, to Emirau. Returning to Purvis Bay at the end of April, she departed 1 May to escort tankers to refueling positions in the Solomons area. On 11 June, after 2 weeks of antisubmarine patrols in the area around Bougainville and New Georgia, she arrived off New Ireland to bombard an enemy tank repair installation, resuming escort duties upon its destruction. Interrupting her escort service between the Admiralties and the Solomons on 23 July, she joined TF 52 at Saipan and took part in the shelling of Tinian.

The Palau Islands offensive was next. She arrived off Peleliu 11 September and remained through the 30th to support the forces landed on the 15th. On her arrival at Manus 4 October, McCord joined CarDiv 22, 7th Fleet, as it prepared for operations in the central Philippines. She arrived at her assigned operating area east of the Philippines as landings were made at Suluan and Dinagat, 17 October. On the 25th her task unit, 77.4.1, came under constant air attack as the Battle off Samar raged 100 miles (160 km) to the north. Escaping damage, McCord protected her unit’s carriers and rescued their pilots. She returned to Manus 3 November, but was back off Leyte by the 16th to prevent enemy surface forces from attacking Allied forces, installations, and shipping in the central Philippines.

On 6 December, at Ulithi, McCord joined the fast carrier force, TF 38. The force sortied from that island on the 10th and steamed to the Philippines to support the Mindoro landings by launching strikes against enemy airfields and harbors in the northern and central islands. Back at Ulithi by the 24th, they sortied again on the 30th. First they struck at Taiwan, 3𔃄 January 1945. Then, in quick succession, they raided enemy installations and shipping in Indochina, southern Taiwan, the China coast, the Philippines, eastern Taiwan, and Okinawa. Constantly moving and always ready for targets of opportunity, the force’s strikes were successful. While in the South China Sea on the 11th and 12th they sank or damaged almost 200,000 tons of enemy shipping.

The force returned to Ulithi 23 January, remaining until 10 February. On the 16th, strikes were launched against Tokyo itself on the 18th against Chichi Jima and on the 20th against Iwo Jima in support of the marine units landed on the 19th. By the 24th, the planes from TF 58 were back over Tokyo and on the 25th they flew against defense installations in the Nagoya-Kobe area.

During March, McCord continued to operate in the screen of TG 58.4 as it concentrated its efforts against Okinawa and southern Kyūshū in preparation for the amphibious assault on the former 1 April. She remained in the Ryūkyū area until 12 May when she escorted South Dakota (BB-57) to Guam. She returned to Okinawa on the 27th for a final 2 weeks of combat. TG 58.4 then retired to Leyte Gulf, arriving 13 June.

McCord departed 4 days later for the west coast and a navy yard overhaul. On 8 July she arrived at Puget Sound, where she was docked when the Japanese surrender was announced. On 7 September she steamed to San Diego, reporting on the 15th to the Inactive Fleet.

Decommissioning 15 January 1947, she remained berthed at San Diego until recommissioning 1 August 1951. Assigned to the Atlantic Fleet, McCord departed San Diego 1 November and reported to ComDesRon 28 at Norfolk on the 17th. For the next year she operated along the east coast, cruising as far north as Halifax Nova Scotia and as far south as the British West Indies.

On 10 January 1953 the destroyer once again got underway for a western Pacific war zone. By 15 February she was off the west coast of Korea operating with carriers in TF 95. She remained in the Yellow Sea combat zone until mid-March when she received a week’s availability at Sasebo. On 26 March she joined TF 77 as it ranged the east coast of Korea providing shore bombardment and fire support services where needed by the U.N. forces. Departing the battleline 17 April, McCord, joined TG㻠.7in exercises off Okinawa. She rejoined TF 77, 14 May, and remained in the Sea of Japan operations area until 5 June when her Korean deployment terminated and she got underway for the United States.

Steaming via Subic Bay, Singapore, Aden, Suez, and Gibraltar, she arrived at Norfolk, Virginia 6 August. During the next months she operated off the southern east coast and in the Caribbean. She decommissioned 9 June 1954 and was berthed at Norfolk, where, as a unit of the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, she has remained into 1969.


‘Mythbusters’ Adam Savage built an ‘Iron Man’ suit that can actually fly

Posted On April 29, 2020 15:51:44

Adam Savage is taking fans on even more adventures in his new show, Savage Builds. In the eight-episode Discovery channel series, the Mythbusters star works with engineers to develop the craziest projects only he could dream up. In the first episode, Savage starts out strong: he creates a real-life bulletproof Iron Man suit that can fly. Yes, you read that right, it can actually fly.

In a short video detailing the episode, Savage explains that he worked with Gravity Industries’ Richard Browning to 3D print the Mark II suit, which is made of titanium. Obviously, technology has clearly come so far to allow for this to be created. “It sounds like hyperbole but I swear, if Tony Fucking Stark was not fictional and he was making an Iron Man suit right now, this is precisely how he would do it and this is the exact technology he’d be using,” says an excited Savage.

The best part? Engineers installed a jetpack and thrusters, so the suit can be lifted off the ground and actually fly. In a clip of Savage testing the flying suit, he yelps with excitement and joy, as anyone who just freaking flew off the ground a la Iron Man would.

“I’m like a kid in a candy store,” he says to cameras prior to the test. Savage’s energy is infectious, and surely, the rest of the series will be just as thrilling.

You can stream the full episode as well as future ones on the Discovery Channel’s website.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

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Product Description

USS McCord DD 534

World Cruise

January 1953 - August 1953 Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing the USS McCord DD 534 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of Call: Panama, San Diego, Pearl Harbor, Midway Island, Japan, Subic Bay Philippines, Singapore, Columbo, Aden, Suez Bay, Athens Greece, Naples and Cannes.
  • Divisional Group Photos
  • Korean War Operations
  • Crossing the Equator
  • Many Crew Activity Photos
  • Plus Much More

Over 198 Photos on Approximately 52 Pages.

Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during this time period.

Additional Bonus:

  • 20 Minute Audio of a " 1967 Equator Crossing " (Not this ship but the Ceremony is Traditional)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.

    If you have any questions please send us an E-mail prior to purchasing.

    Buyer pays shipping and handling. Shipping charges outside the US will vary by location.

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    This CD is for your personal use only

    Copyright © 2003-2010 Great Naval Images LLC. All rights reserved.


    Afghanistan is producing more opium than ever before

    Posted On June 15, 2018 17:10:29

    In 15 years in Afghanistan, no counternarcotics effort undertaken by the US, it partners, or the Afghan government has led to sustained reductions in poppy cultivation or opium production.

    That was one of a number of findings of a Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Report issued in June 2018, underlining insufficient, uncoordinated, and at-times counterproductive initiatives in Afghanistan to reduce drug production there.

    Between 2002 and 2017, the US government has allocated roughly $8.62 billion to fight narcotics in Afghanistan. But the drug trade remains entrenched. Opium is Afghanistan’s largest cash crop, reaching an export value of $1.5 billion to $3 billion in recent years. In 2017 alone, poppy cultivation was thought to support 590,000 full-time jobs — which is more people than are employed by Afghanistan’s military and security forces.

    Heroin and opium produced in Afghanistan are trafficked largely to Europe, Africa, and other parts of Asia. (SIGAR)

    The primary markets are Europe, Asia, and Africa. Opiates from Afghanistan travel through other Central or South Asian states — drug addiction has exploded in Iran, with opium making up two-thirds of consumption — to reach destinations in Europe and Asia. Drugs also travel maritime routes to Africa and Oceania.

    Ninety percent of the heroin seized in Canada comes from Afghanistan, but scant amounts reach the US — 1% or less of the drug seized in the US can be traced back to the Central Asian country.

    The amount of Southwest Asian heroin in the US peaked in the early 1980s, according to the DEA. It was replaced by Southeast Asian heroin — largely from Laos, Myanmar, and Thailand — in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

    The amount of South American heroin found the US started to increase in the mid-1990s, but by the late 2000s, Mexican heroin started to become predominant — in 2015 it was the more than 90% of the heroin seized in the US.

    The share of US heroin sourced to Mexico has grown considerably in recent years. (2017 DEA NDTA)

    Opium has been cultivated in Afghanistan for centuries. It was under royal control from 1933 to 1973, but the Soviet invasion and occupation from 1979 to 1989 crippled the legitimate economy and allowed illegal enterprises and criminal networks to thrive.

    Production soared after the Taliban took control of most of the country in 1996. But it banned the crop in 2000, leading to a 75% drop in the global supply of heroin but leaving farmers destitute, as no alternative to poppy cultivation was provided.

    Cultivation was at a historic low in 2001, when the US and its coalition partners invaded. Counterdrug work was done in the period that followed, but the vacuum created by the lack of functioning Afghan institutions limited their effectiveness.

    Despite year-to-year variations, poppy cultivation in Afghanistan has steadily increased over the last 20 years. (SIGAR)

    2004 saw an increase in cultivation, which was followed by more concerted US efforts to staunch it as well as increased counternarcotics efforts by coalition partners. Cultivation leveled off in 2009 and 2010 — around the time of the US-led surge that brought more attention to combating the drug trade.

    But cultivation started to rise in 2011, compounded by missteps and a reduced emphasis on counternarcotics. “From 2013 to 2016, drug production continued at or near the highest levels ever consistently seen in Afghanistan,” the report states. Recent years have also seen eradication stall.

    A UN survey in 2017 found cultivation had hit a new high, covering more than 810,000 acres. (The Taliban has also expanded its involvement in the drug trade.)

    2017 also saw a new Trump administration strategy that brought with it an “unprecedented” level of attention to Afghan drug production by US military commanders, according to the report — marked by a “sustained air interdiction campaign” that included advanced aircraft striking rudimentary drug labs.

    A US-led airstrike on a Taliban drug lab in northern Helmand Province, November 2017. (US Air Force photo)

    The increases in drug cultivation make clear the failure of counternarcotics efforts, the report says, but it stresses that those failures are not the only factors that have led to the increases.

    “The exponential rise in opium poppy cultivation and drug production is rooted in far-reaching, persistent challenges in Afghanistan — namely, lack of security, a poor economy, weak governing institutions, and failures of the wider reconstruction effort,” the report states.

    “Given these challenges, there are serious limitations to the US capacity to bring about large-scale, lasting reductions in poppy cultivation and drug production,” it adds, noting the opium economy will continue to undercut US efforts in Afghanistan.

    “Therefore, ongoing US reconstruction efforts must effectively address, or at least attempt to mitigate, the drug-related threats to Afghan security and stability.”

    This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

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    Question on using using Trumpeter 1/350 USS The Sullivans kit for Korean War Fletcher-class Destroyer

    Jun 04, 2018 #1 2018-06-04T22:20

    From the information that I was able to gather on the USS Kimberly (DD-521) during its Korean War deployment it appears that I could probably use the Trumpeter 1/350 USS The Sullivans DD-537 kit almost out of the box to replicate it, minus aftermarket decals to represent the larger, shadowed hull numbers (http://www.goldmm.com/ships/350-1D.htm).

    Please see the below links regarding the Kimberly and the Trumpeter kit and let me know if you agree or not. Please note the 2nd link on the Kimberly in particular where it mentions that the Group 1 ships were basically in their WWII configuration with some ASW improvements:

    Jun 05, 2018 #2 2018-06-05T13:07

    The Trumpeter 'The Sullivans' is probably the best way to get to your goal in plastic, but that kit is not without its problems. The deck features raised sidewalks when in reality they should be stick-on rubber non-skid matting. Think of your old front door mat. They really need to be sanded down. The 40-mm guns are little more than sticks on boxes and the 20-mm guns are 10 feet tall (to match our 10 foot tall sailors - no wonder we won!). Replacements are available should you choose to go there. The stack side grating also needs attention

    The description of Group 1 boats and the drawing of the McCord are inconsistent with the picture you linked


    "Profile of the USS McCord (DD-534) is typical of the group. Armament: five 5-in./38 cal gun mounts, two quadruple 40mm and one twin 40mm gun mounts, one quintuple 21-in. torpedo tube mount, two Mk 10/11 hedgehog mounts, and one depth charge release track/one storage rack. Fire Control: one MK-37 GFCS with MK 25 radar, two Mk 63 GFCS with MK 19 radar, one MK 51 GFCS with MK 14 gun sight, and two MK 27 torpedo directors. Radar: SR air search set (pole foremast) and one SPS-10 surface navigational set. Sonar: one QHB set with TRR and attack plotter, one MK 102 UFCS. "

    The drawing of the McCord shows a late-war Anti-kamikaze fit which The Sullivans received and as she exists in Buffalo currently.

    There should be 5 twin 40-mm mounts with a total of 10 gun tubes instead of 2 quads and a twin.
    The photo appears to show 2 quint torpedo banks.
    Hedgehog launchers are not visible in this view, but I have seen a forward quarter view taken at the same time (same shadow under whale boat) which the lockers were not present. She did have hedgehogs when transferred to the Taiwanese navy.
    Two depth charge tracks vice 1 cited in description
    MK37 with MK25 radar. No the MK25 is the round dish seen on many post-war mods. Your photo shows the typical wartime radar mounted in the MK37.
    The MK63 Gun director is an on-mount system for late/post-war quad 40mm guns. Your picture downst show.
    You should have 3 to 5 MK51 gun directors for the twin 40mm present in your picture..emts are

    Jun 05, 2018 #3 2018-06-05T19:40

    Aha, I found the forward quarter photo that pairs with the one you linked

    However, I also found a photo which purports to be from the 1952 world cruise cruisebook.


    Its from an eBay listing. This looks to be more in line with the description of the McCord cited above. You will also have to deal with enclosing the bridge area forward

    Jun 05, 2018 #4 2018-06-05T19:59

    Thanks! Did you also find some of your information from this?: http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/pix1/0552115.jpg

    Jun 05, 2018 #5 2018-06-05T20:04

    Jun 16, 2018 #6 2018-06-16T13:35

    2:46 AM - Mar 19 #7 2021-03-19T02:46

    Overhead picture of the Kimberly in Korean War configuration my Dad received this in a frame along with his name and campaign bars along the bottom of the matting when he was discharged. Can anyone provide me with additional information on the weaponry configuration as discussed above?

    viD8HSPL8xsqBSZU2R9ZmOg__&Key-Pair-Id=APKAJS72YROXJYGYDADA" />

    7:13 PM - Mar 23 #8 2021-03-23T19:13

    I’ve been away from home and many of my references. Sorry for the delay

    This photo pairs well with the 1952 Cruise Book photo you posted previously showing the port bow quarter. This one shows a bit more and additional references can be made.

    First of all, the 5”/38 guns are in the Fletcher standard 2 forward & 3 aft configuration. Standard layout, nothing interesting to discuss.

    If you go to destroyerhistory.org select Fletcher, then pick the armament tab you will see an interesting graphic showing the armament progression of the Fletchers through WWII. You will see that the Kimberly received the 14 tube anti-Kamikaze refit. The 14 tubes refer to the 40mm BOFORS layout a pair of twin 40s (P & S) in tubs below the bridge just aft of the second 5-inch gun, a pair of quad 40s (P & S) in tubs at the waist, and a single twin 40 in the raised D-shaped tub between 5-inch gun mounts 3 and 4. Post-war, to provide increased ASW capability, the forward twin 40s were landed and in their place was added a Hedgehog ASW mortar. Your picture and the 52 cruise book both show this. The tub is removed, the launcher box is added along with ready service lockers one inboard and one aft (P & S).

    On top of the bridgehouse is the MK37 gun director. It is a later mod with the director officer’s pulpit on the left front top face and the MK25 radar (round dish). Interestingly, a photo of the Kimberly supposedly dated February, 1951 shows the radars as the earlier MK12 (rectangular)/MK22 (orange peel) combo http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/pix1/0552103.jpg . The MK37 primarily controlled the 5-inch guns, but the 40s could also accept control. The mast is a single pole with a late war/early postwar electronics suite (radar, EW, IFF). The flag hoist is the Kimberly’s call sign, NIZD.

    Aft of the forward stack there is an oval structure with canvas covered dodgers. This structure was added as part of the anti-Kamikaze refit. Originally it held the MK51 controllers for the midship 40mm guns. These were replaced with a MK56 director which was a radar assisted unit which could control the quad 40s as well as the after twin. If you look at the D-shaped tub between mounts 3 and 4 you will not see the local MK51 director used during WWII.

    Quad 40s at the waist (P & S): I see four tubes each. If there were two tubes per it would indicate a later 3-inch twin mount which was a common post war update. Two tubes in the raised D tub a twin 40. The Kimberly in this photo has 10x 40mm tubes.

    Aft of the after stack is a quintuple 21-inch torpedo launcher. It has a blast shield (tuna fish can) for crew protection from the blast of the superfiring 5-inch gun. The forward torpedo bank was removed as part of the anti-Kamikaze refit.

    On the main deck below the torpedo tubes I can see one, perhaps two 20mm Oerlikon guns. The forward gun is indistinct, as there are a couple sailors nearby. The aft gun shows the distinctive gun shield. The gun itself is shrouded in canvas. From the previous photo I presume there are an identical configuration on the port side. The other 20mm gun tub looks to be a “truncated heart” shaped tub on the stern between the 5 th 5-inch mount and the depth charge rails. The starboard gun’s shield is visible. There would be a similar gun on the port side.

    Depth charges I can see three throwers/ready racks on the main deck below the D-shaped tub. There are another set on the port side. At this time the depth charges were 500 lb MK9 streamlined weapons. On the fantail there are a pair of release tracks (P & S). The pair of racks between the release tracks, angled inward, were ready reload racks.


    Commander McCord, along with Rear Admiral William A. Moffett were the Chief Officers of the U.S.S. Akron when it encountered severe weather and crashed near Barnegat Light, New Jersey on 4 April 1933. Commander McCord, Admiral Moffett and 71 other persons were killed.

    United States Ship McCord (DD-534), a destroyer, was laid down 17 March 1942 at the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Company in San Francisco and launched 10 January 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Frank C. McCord, the widow of Commander Frank C. McCord for whom the destroyer was named.


    McCoy was born on May 2, 1844, in Colchester, Ontario, Canada, to George and Mildred Goins McCoy. The McCoys were fugitive slaves who had escaped from Kentucky to Canada via the Underground Railroad. In 1847, the large family returned to the United States, settling in Ypsilanti, Michigan.

    Beginning at a young age, McCoy showed a strong interest in mechanics. His parents arranged for him to travel to Scotland at the age of 15 for an apprenticeship in mechanical engineering. He returned home to Michigan after becoming certified as a mechanical engineer.

    Despite his qualifications, McCoy was unable to find work as an engineer in the United States due to racial barriers skilled professional positions were not available for African Americans at the time, regardless of their training or background. McCoy accepted a position as a fireman and oiler for the Michigan Central Railroad. It was in this line of work that he developed his first major inventions. After studying the inefficiencies inherent in the existing system of oiling axles, McCoy invented a lubricating cup that distributed oil evenly over the engine&aposs moving parts. He obtained a patent for this invention, which allowed trains to run continuously for long periods of time without pausing for maintenance.


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